EXERCISE FOR BREAST CANCER SURVIVORS: ITS EFFECT ON WEIGHT AND BODY COMPOSITION

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164662
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
EXERCISE FOR BREAST CANCER SURVIVORS: ITS EFFECT ON WEIGHT AND BODY COMPOSITION
Author(s):
Ingram, Carolyn
Author Details:
Carolyn Ingram, RN, DNS, McMaster University, McMaster University , School of Nursing, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
Abstract:
Exercise is a promising intervention for cancer-related symptom management. Knowledge of the effect of exercise on weight and body composition in women receiving adjuvant breast cancer treatment is required so that nurses can tailor appropriate exercise recommendations to the specific needs of these women. Evidence regarding the effects of exercise on weight and body composition during early breast cancer was evaluated and synthesized in order to make recommendations for future research and practice. Studies of breast cancer and exercise have focused on ameliorating symptoms such as fatigue, negative mood and reduced function. Weight and body composition have seldom been addressed. With newer therapies, the problem of weight gain during adjuvant breast cancer treatment has diminished. However, negative body composition changes, particularly increases in percentage of body fat, are a problem. The effect of exercise on these outcomes requires further examination A systematic review of the literature was conducted. Medline/PreMedline, CancerLIT, Cochrane Central Register, CINAHL, Embase, PEDRO, and Sport Discus were searched. Electronic searches were augmented by hand and ancestry searches and key researchers were contacted. Strict criteria were established for retrieval and evaluation of studies. All research designs except case studies were included. Titles and abstracts of 1315 references were screened, 82 were reviewed, and 13 primary studies met the inclusion criteria. The majority of studies examined aerobic activity. Changes in weight and body composition were rarely considered or were of secondary interest. Where these outcomes were studied, beneficial effects were consistently seen. Body fat percentage was often maintained or reduced, although weight change was rarely seen. Because weight and body composition were of secondary interest, there were problems with measurement rigor. Studies were not long enough to produce durable changes in weight or body composition. Furthermore lymphedema, which can profoundly affect weight and body composition estimates, was studied as a separate entity. Current evidence does not support knowledgeable and safe recommendations related to exercise for weight and body composition management in women with early breast cancer. Research is needed in which these outcomes are of primary importance. There are also several measurement issues to address in planning future studies.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program, U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, Office of the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP).
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEXERCISE FOR BREAST CANCER SURVIVORS: ITS EFFECT ON WEIGHT AND BODY COMPOSITIONen_GB
dc.contributor.authorIngram, Carolynen_US
dc.author.detailsCarolyn Ingram, RN, DNS, McMaster University, McMaster University , School of Nursing, Hamilton, Ontario, Canadaen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164662-
dc.description.abstractExercise is a promising intervention for cancer-related symptom management. Knowledge of the effect of exercise on weight and body composition in women receiving adjuvant breast cancer treatment is required so that nurses can tailor appropriate exercise recommendations to the specific needs of these women. Evidence regarding the effects of exercise on weight and body composition during early breast cancer was evaluated and synthesized in order to make recommendations for future research and practice. Studies of breast cancer and exercise have focused on ameliorating symptoms such as fatigue, negative mood and reduced function. Weight and body composition have seldom been addressed. With newer therapies, the problem of weight gain during adjuvant breast cancer treatment has diminished. However, negative body composition changes, particularly increases in percentage of body fat, are a problem. The effect of exercise on these outcomes requires further examination A systematic review of the literature was conducted. Medline/PreMedline, CancerLIT, Cochrane Central Register, CINAHL, Embase, PEDRO, and Sport Discus were searched. Electronic searches were augmented by hand and ancestry searches and key researchers were contacted. Strict criteria were established for retrieval and evaluation of studies. All research designs except case studies were included. Titles and abstracts of 1315 references were screened, 82 were reviewed, and 13 primary studies met the inclusion criteria. The majority of studies examined aerobic activity. Changes in weight and body composition were rarely considered or were of secondary interest. Where these outcomes were studied, beneficial effects were consistently seen. Body fat percentage was often maintained or reduced, although weight change was rarely seen. Because weight and body composition were of secondary interest, there were problems with measurement rigor. Studies were not long enough to produce durable changes in weight or body composition. Furthermore lymphedema, which can profoundly affect weight and body composition estimates, was studied as a separate entity. Current evidence does not support knowledgeable and safe recommendations related to exercise for weight and body composition management in women with early breast cancer. Research is needed in which these outcomes are of primary importance. There are also several measurement issues to address in planning future studies.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:04:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:04:45Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program, U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, Office of the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP).-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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