DIFFERENCES IN THE PREVALENCE AND SEVERITY OF SIDE EFFECTS BASED ON TYPE OF ANALGESIC PRESCRIPTION

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164663
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
DIFFERENCES IN THE PREVALENCE AND SEVERITY OF SIDE EFFECTS BASED ON TYPE OF ANALGESIC PRESCRIPTION
Author(s):
Kim, Esther; Villars, Patrice; Miaskowski, Christine; West, Claudia; Dodd, Marylin; Paul, Steven
Author Details:
Esther Kim, RN,MS, University of California - San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA; Patrice Villars, RN, BS; Christine Miaskowski, RN, PhD, FAAN; Claudia West, RN, MS; Marylin Dodd, RN, PhD, FAAN; Steven Paul, PhD
Abstract:
Side effects of analgesics are a well-documented barrier to effective pain management. However, very little data are available on the prevalence and severity of side effects associated with different types of analgesic prescriptions. As part of a larger study that evaluated the effectiveness the PRO-SELFÓ Pain Control Program, the purposes of this study in a sample of oncology outpatients with pain from bone metastasis (n=174) were to determine if there were differences in the prevalence and severity of side effects associated with four different types of analgesic prescriptions (i.e., no opioid, only as needed (PRN) opioid, only an around-the-clock (ATC) opioid, or a PRN+ATC opioid). Orem’s theory of self-care, as well as the concepts of academic detail and nurse coaching were the theoretical foundations for the study. Patients completed a demographic questionnaire and a pain diary with a side effect checklist on which they indicated if they experienced the side effect and rated its severity using a Likert scale (1 = slight to 4 = very severe). Patients in the no opioid group were the youngest and had the best Karnofsky Performance Status score. Differences in prevalence of all of the side effects (i.e., lack of energy, nightmares, nausea, vomiting, constipation, feeling drowsy, lightheadedness, and poor coordination) except difficulty sleeping and indigestion were found among the four groups. The most prevalent side effect in the ATC+PRN group was feeling drowsy (83.3%). The most prevalent side effect in the no opioid group was difficulty sleeping (56.2%). Across the three groups of patients who took an opioid analgesic, the prevalence of constipation ranged from 44% to 63.3%. Significant differences in the severity of side effects were found among the four groups. In addition, significant positive correlations were found between the severity of all of the side effects and the dose of opioid analgesic taken. This study is the first to document the prevalence and severity of analgesic side effects in a large sample of oncology outpatients. Patients who were receiving ATC or ATC+PRN opioid analgesics were at greatest risk for side effects and when they occurred these side effects were more severe.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: National Cancer Institute.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDIFFERENCES IN THE PREVALENCE AND SEVERITY OF SIDE EFFECTS BASED ON TYPE OF ANALGESIC PRESCRIPTIONen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKim, Estheren_US
dc.contributor.authorVillars, Patriceen_US
dc.contributor.authorMiaskowski, Christineen_US
dc.contributor.authorWest, Claudiaen_US
dc.contributor.authorDodd, Marylinen_US
dc.contributor.authorPaul, Stevenen_US
dc.author.detailsEsther Kim, RN,MS, University of California - San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA; Patrice Villars, RN, BS; Christine Miaskowski, RN, PhD, FAAN; Claudia West, RN, MS; Marylin Dodd, RN, PhD, FAAN; Steven Paul, PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164663-
dc.description.abstractSide effects of analgesics are a well-documented barrier to effective pain management. However, very little data are available on the prevalence and severity of side effects associated with different types of analgesic prescriptions. As part of a larger study that evaluated the effectiveness the PRO-SELFÓ Pain Control Program, the purposes of this study in a sample of oncology outpatients with pain from bone metastasis (n=174) were to determine if there were differences in the prevalence and severity of side effects associated with four different types of analgesic prescriptions (i.e., no opioid, only as needed (PRN) opioid, only an around-the-clock (ATC) opioid, or a PRN+ATC opioid). Orem’s theory of self-care, as well as the concepts of academic detail and nurse coaching were the theoretical foundations for the study. Patients completed a demographic questionnaire and a pain diary with a side effect checklist on which they indicated if they experienced the side effect and rated its severity using a Likert scale (1 = slight to 4 = very severe). Patients in the no opioid group were the youngest and had the best Karnofsky Performance Status score. Differences in prevalence of all of the side effects (i.e., lack of energy, nightmares, nausea, vomiting, constipation, feeling drowsy, lightheadedness, and poor coordination) except difficulty sleeping and indigestion were found among the four groups. The most prevalent side effect in the ATC+PRN group was feeling drowsy (83.3%). The most prevalent side effect in the no opioid group was difficulty sleeping (56.2%). Across the three groups of patients who took an opioid analgesic, the prevalence of constipation ranged from 44% to 63.3%. Significant differences in the severity of side effects were found among the four groups. In addition, significant positive correlations were found between the severity of all of the side effects and the dose of opioid analgesic taken. This study is the first to document the prevalence and severity of analgesic side effects in a large sample of oncology outpatients. Patients who were receiving ATC or ATC+PRN opioid analgesics were at greatest risk for side effects and when they occurred these side effects were more severe.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:04:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:04:46Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: National Cancer Institute.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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