FAMILY INVOLVEMENT IN DECISION-MAKING FOR PRIMARY TREATMENT IN CHINESE AMERICAN WOMEN WITH EARLY-STAGE BREAST CANCER

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164664
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
FAMILY INVOLVEMENT IN DECISION-MAKING FOR PRIMARY TREATMENT IN CHINESE AMERICAN WOMEN WITH EARLY-STAGE BREAST CANCER
Author(s):
Lee, Shiu-yu; Knobf, M.Tish
Author Details:
Shiu-yu Lee, RN, MSN, DNSc, National Taipei, Taipei, Taiwan; M. Tish Knobf, PhD, FAAN
Abstract:
Significance: Breast cancer is the most common cancer among the growing population of Chinese American (ChA) women in the United States. Traditionally, the role of the Chinese family when a member is ill is not limited to physical care, but has significant involvement in healthcare decision-making. Yet, there is a lack of knowledge about family involvement in decision-making for primary treatment in ChA women with breast cancer. Purpose: To describe family involvement in decision-making for primary treatment in ChA women with early-stage breast cancer. Theoretical Framework: Ottawa Decisional Support Framework and Kleinman’s family-patient transaction in Chinese culture were used to identify family involvement in treatment decision-making. Methods: This was part of a larger quantitative descriptive study. Three open-ended questions in Chinese were used to elicit ChA women’s experience of family involvement in treatment decision-making. A convenience sample of 123 ChA women with early-stage breast cancer were recruited in the larger New York area. The subject’s responses were written in Chinese immediately during the interview, and validated by the subject for accuracy. Content analysis was used to code and categorize the data. The coding and analysis were reviewed by another researcher based on English-translated responses from 20 purposively selected subjects with equivalence from the Chinese responses. Findings and Implications: ChA women described involvement of their family in treatment decision-making as supportive and caring. Immediate and/or extended family members were involved by learning breast cancer together, managing healthcare issues, managing family life, and by providing companionship and support. Family-involvement was characterized as a strong voice in treatment decision-making, a collaborator, a sounding board, or a facilitator. Barriers to family members being involved were lack of knowledge, English fluency, timing, distance and conflict. Resentment and conflict occurred when a family member’s involvement differed from the woman’s preference for the family member to be involved. Family involvement is integral to ChA women’s decision-making but the women’s preference for family involvement should be respected. Culturally sensitive patient and family consultation strategies are needed to assist an informed treatment decision-making in ChA women with breast cancer.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: Funded by the ONS Foundation.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFAMILY INVOLVEMENT IN DECISION-MAKING FOR PRIMARY TREATMENT IN CHINESE AMERICAN WOMEN WITH EARLY-STAGE BREAST CANCERen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLee, Shiu-yuen_US
dc.contributor.authorKnobf, M.Tishen_US
dc.author.detailsShiu-yu Lee, RN, MSN, DNSc, National Taipei, Taipei, Taiwan; M. Tish Knobf, PhD, FAANen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164664-
dc.description.abstractSignificance: Breast cancer is the most common cancer among the growing population of Chinese American (ChA) women in the United States. Traditionally, the role of the Chinese family when a member is ill is not limited to physical care, but has significant involvement in healthcare decision-making. Yet, there is a lack of knowledge about family involvement in decision-making for primary treatment in ChA women with breast cancer. Purpose: To describe family involvement in decision-making for primary treatment in ChA women with early-stage breast cancer. Theoretical Framework: Ottawa Decisional Support Framework and Kleinman’s family-patient transaction in Chinese culture were used to identify family involvement in treatment decision-making. Methods: This was part of a larger quantitative descriptive study. Three open-ended questions in Chinese were used to elicit ChA women’s experience of family involvement in treatment decision-making. A convenience sample of 123 ChA women with early-stage breast cancer were recruited in the larger New York area. The subject’s responses were written in Chinese immediately during the interview, and validated by the subject for accuracy. Content analysis was used to code and categorize the data. The coding and analysis were reviewed by another researcher based on English-translated responses from 20 purposively selected subjects with equivalence from the Chinese responses. Findings and Implications: ChA women described involvement of their family in treatment decision-making as supportive and caring. Immediate and/or extended family members were involved by learning breast cancer together, managing healthcare issues, managing family life, and by providing companionship and support. Family-involvement was characterized as a strong voice in treatment decision-making, a collaborator, a sounding board, or a facilitator. Barriers to family members being involved were lack of knowledge, English fluency, timing, distance and conflict. Resentment and conflict occurred when a family member’s involvement differed from the woman’s preference for the family member to be involved. Family involvement is integral to ChA women’s decision-making but the women’s preference for family involvement should be respected. Culturally sensitive patient and family consultation strategies are needed to assist an informed treatment decision-making in ChA women with breast cancer.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:04:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:04:47Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: Funded by the ONS Foundation.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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