2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164665
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
QUALITY OF LIFE IN ADULTS WITH HODGKINS DISEASE: STATE OF THE SCIENCE
Author(s):
McDermott, Kathleen; Roper, Kristin; Cooley, Mary E.; Boyd, Kecia; Coakley, Christine; Fawcett, Jacqueline
Author Details:
Kathleen McDermott, BSN, RN, OCN, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; Kristin Roper, MS, RN; Mary E. Cooley, PhD, RN, CS; Kecia Boyd, RN, BSN, OCN; Christine Coakley, RN, MPH, OCN; Jacqueline Fawcett, PhD, RN, FAAN
Abstract:
Hodgkin’s Disease (HD) affects both younger and older adults and has the potential to disrupt developmental tasks. Because long-term survival is excellent, an understanding of issues related to quality of life (QOL) is a critical first step in designing intervention studies. The purpose of this abstract is to present a review of studies examining QOL in adults with HD. Ganong’s guidelines for conducting integrative reviews were used to guide this review. Computer searches were performed from January 1984 through April 2004. Key words used to access the articles were “HD and Survivor”, “HD and Survivorship”, “HD and QOL” and “HD and Health Related Quality of Life”. The published reports of empirical studies that explicitly included HD, survivor, and QOL were included in the review. Studies examining symptoms and psychosocial adaptation were also included. The final review encompassed 30 studies. Content analysis was performed to identify common themes among the studies. Studies were conducted in the United States and Europe. The mean age of subjects in these studies was 40 years (range: 17-85) with a gender split of 50-60% males and 40-50% females. Eighty-three percent of patients in this review were evaluated from 1 year to 35 years post-treatment. Remaining patients were studied during the first year after diagnosis. One article identified a theoretical framework to guide the study. A variety of instruments were used to measure varying aspects of QOL without consistency and standardization. Fourteen descriptive studies were identified. Most descriptive studies focused on the negative impact of physical symptoms on psychosocial and functional ability. Fifteen comparative studies examined differences between adults with HD and other samples. Many comparative studies identified the negative impact fatigue had on QOL. Functional and psychological factors that were commonly affected included increased depression and diminished work and leisure activities. One study involved the test of an intervention; results indicated that aerobic activity has a positive impact on chronic fatigue. Oncology nurses play a key role in promoting QOL among adults with cancer. This integrative literature review can be used to inform and help guide future studies of the QOL of HD survivors.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: Funded by the ONS Foundation through an unrestricted grant from the Oncology Nursing Certification Corporation.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQUALITY OF LIFE IN ADULTS WITH HODGKINS DISEASE: STATE OF THE SCIENCEen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcDermott, Kathleenen_US
dc.contributor.authorRoper, Kristinen_US
dc.contributor.authorCooley, Mary E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBoyd, Keciaen_US
dc.contributor.authorCoakley, Christineen_US
dc.contributor.authorFawcett, Jacquelineen_US
dc.author.detailsKathleen McDermott, BSN, RN, OCN, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; Kristin Roper, MS, RN; Mary E. Cooley, PhD, RN, CS; Kecia Boyd, RN, BSN, OCN; Christine Coakley, RN, MPH, OCN; Jacqueline Fawcett, PhD, RN, FAANen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164665-
dc.description.abstractHodgkin’s Disease (HD) affects both younger and older adults and has the potential to disrupt developmental tasks. Because long-term survival is excellent, an understanding of issues related to quality of life (QOL) is a critical first step in designing intervention studies. The purpose of this abstract is to present a review of studies examining QOL in adults with HD. Ganong’s guidelines for conducting integrative reviews were used to guide this review. Computer searches were performed from January 1984 through April 2004. Key words used to access the articles were “HD and Survivor”, “HD and Survivorship”, “HD and QOL” and “HD and Health Related Quality of Life”. The published reports of empirical studies that explicitly included HD, survivor, and QOL were included in the review. Studies examining symptoms and psychosocial adaptation were also included. The final review encompassed 30 studies. Content analysis was performed to identify common themes among the studies. Studies were conducted in the United States and Europe. The mean age of subjects in these studies was 40 years (range: 17-85) with a gender split of 50-60% males and 40-50% females. Eighty-three percent of patients in this review were evaluated from 1 year to 35 years post-treatment. Remaining patients were studied during the first year after diagnosis. One article identified a theoretical framework to guide the study. A variety of instruments were used to measure varying aspects of QOL without consistency and standardization. Fourteen descriptive studies were identified. Most descriptive studies focused on the negative impact of physical symptoms on psychosocial and functional ability. Fifteen comparative studies examined differences between adults with HD and other samples. Many comparative studies identified the negative impact fatigue had on QOL. Functional and psychological factors that were commonly affected included increased depression and diminished work and leisure activities. One study involved the test of an intervention; results indicated that aerobic activity has a positive impact on chronic fatigue. Oncology nurses play a key role in promoting QOL among adults with cancer. This integrative literature review can be used to inform and help guide future studies of the QOL of HD survivors.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:04:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:04:48Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: Funded by the ONS Foundation through an unrestricted grant from the Oncology Nursing Certification Corporation.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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