2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164667
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
THE MEASUREMENT OF MODESTY AMONG JEWISH AMERICAN WOMEN
Author Details:
Caryn Scheinberg, CRNP, PhD, Northwest Hospital Center, Randallstown, Maryland, USA
Abstract:
Cultural-modesty was found to influence breast and cervical cancer screening among Chinese, Hispanic, and Muslim cultures. It was hypothesized that highly observant Jewish women who practice strict practices of modesty may underutilize preventive health care services. However, the construct of modesty was not well-defined in the literature, and a measure was not found. “Your Views of Modesty” was developed to explore those relationships This research study aimed to develop and test an instrument to measure the general construct of modesty. The measure of modesty was tested in the context of breast cancer screening. An expansion of Champion’s Behavioral Model for Mammography Utilization was used. Design: A cross-sectional mailed survey design was used. Procedure: Hadassah, a Jewish women’s organization, mailed out 2000 study packets to women on their mailing list. Sample: Adult Jewish women, over the age of 18 were mailed surveys. Three hundred and seven Jewish women returned surveys (15% response rate). Ages 26-95 years (mean 67 years), 89% Ashkenazi Jewish, Sephardic 3%, 3% other/both. Religious group denomination: 5% no religion; 21% Reform; 54% Conservative; and 17% Orthodox. Analysis: Internal consistency reliability was estimated using Cronbach’s alpha and item-total correlations. Validity estimation included convergent, discriminant, and construct validity using hypothesis testing. Bivariate correlations and ANOVA related scores of “Your Views of Modesty”, religiosity, with religious group denomination. Descriptive statistics provided measures of central tendency and dispersion of the total scores of the modesty and religiosity scales (summed scores). Findings: Reliability for “Your Views of Modesty” was Cronbach’s alpha of .92. Item-total correlations ranged from .34 -.74 indicating high reliability. Modesty was correlated with religiosity (r=.26, p <.01). Total modesty scores and self ranked modesty were moderately related (r= .67, p<.01). Implications: Many qualitative studies identified modesty as a barrier to health care. Future research, testing the construct of modesty using “Your Views of Modesty” with Muslim, Chinese, and Hispanic women who have cultural rules about modesty will provide knowledge of modesty and health care utilization. In clinical practice, the understanding of cultural modesty is paramount for providing culturally tailored care.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: University of Maryland Womens Health Research Group.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTHE MEASUREMENT OF MODESTY AMONG JEWISH AMERICAN WOMENen_GB
dc.author.detailsCaryn Scheinberg, CRNP, PhD, Northwest Hospital Center, Randallstown, Maryland, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164667-
dc.description.abstractCultural-modesty was found to influence breast and cervical cancer screening among Chinese, Hispanic, and Muslim cultures. It was hypothesized that highly observant Jewish women who practice strict practices of modesty may underutilize preventive health care services. However, the construct of modesty was not well-defined in the literature, and a measure was not found. &ldquo;Your Views of Modesty&rdquo; was developed to explore those relationships This research study aimed to develop and test an instrument to measure the general construct of modesty. The measure of modesty was tested in the context of breast cancer screening. An expansion of Champion&rsquo;s Behavioral Model for Mammography Utilization was used. Design: A cross-sectional mailed survey design was used. Procedure: Hadassah, a Jewish women&rsquo;s organization, mailed out 2000 study packets to women on their mailing list. Sample: Adult Jewish women, over the age of 18 were mailed surveys. Three hundred and seven Jewish women returned surveys (15% response rate). Ages 26-95 years (mean 67 years), 89% Ashkenazi Jewish, Sephardic 3%, 3% other/both. Religious group denomination: 5% no religion; 21% Reform; 54% Conservative; and 17% Orthodox. Analysis: Internal consistency reliability was estimated using Cronbach&rsquo;s alpha and item-total correlations. Validity estimation included convergent, discriminant, and construct validity using hypothesis testing. Bivariate correlations and ANOVA related scores of &ldquo;Your Views of Modesty&rdquo;, religiosity, with religious group denomination. Descriptive statistics provided measures of central tendency and dispersion of the total scores of the modesty and religiosity scales (summed scores). Findings: Reliability for &ldquo;Your Views of Modesty&rdquo; was Cronbach&rsquo;s alpha of .92. Item-total correlations ranged from .34 -.74 indicating high reliability. Modesty was correlated with religiosity (r=.26, p &lt;.01). Total modesty scores and self ranked modesty were moderately related (r= .67, p&lt;.01). Implications: Many qualitative studies identified modesty as a barrier to health care. Future research, testing the construct of modesty using &ldquo;Your Views of Modesty&rdquo; with Muslim, Chinese, and Hispanic women who have cultural rules about modesty will provide knowledge of modesty and health care utilization. In clinical practice, the understanding of cultural modesty is paramount for providing culturally tailored care.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:04:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:04:50Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: University of Maryland Womens Health Research Group.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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