2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164668
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A QUALITATIVE COMPONENT OF A RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL
Author(s):
Schumacher, Karen; Koresawa, Setsuko; West, Claudia; Dodd, Marylin; Paul, Steven; Miaskowski, Christine
Author Details:
Karen Schumacher, RN, PhD, Univesity of Nebraska Medical Center, College of Nursing, Omaha, Nebraska, USA; Setsuko Koresawa, RN, MS; Claudia West, RN, MS; Marylin Dodd, RN, PhD; Steven Paul, PhD; Christine Miaskowski, RN, PhD
Abstract:
To describe a method of nesting qualitative research within a randomized clinical trial (RCT) using audiotaped intervention sessions as a source of data. Qualitative research may fruitfully be combined with intervention studies but few examples exist detailing methodological strategies for doing so. Audiotaped intervention sessions in a RCT provide extensive qualitative data on the implementation of the intervention that can be used for knowledge development about the intervention itself. As audiotaping increasingly is used as a strategy for monitoring treatment integrity for psychoeducational interventions, large qualitative databases will become available for substantive data analysis, as well as for quality assurance purposes. This presentation will provide an example of how one research team used those data. In a recently completed RCT of a nursing intervention called the PRO-SELF© Pain Control Program the teaching/coaching sessions with oncology outpatients experiencing pain from bone metastases and their family caregivers were audiotaped originally for quality assurance purposes. However, early reviews of the audiotapes revealed that they were a rich source of data about patients’ and family caregivers’ experiences with pain management. To mine this data source, we applied for and received an administrative supplement to the NCI funded study in order to transcribe the audiotapes and conduct a qualitative study. Our objectives were 1) to better understand the pain management difficulties patients and family caregivers brought to the interventionist’s attention, 2) to better understand patients for whom the intervention did not work, and 3) to describe how patients and family caregivers used specific pain management tools. We will describe the sampling strategies and analytic procedures for each objective and the way in which the qualitative results will be used in future RCTs. In large programs of research, interventions are developed and refined across multiple studies. Conducting a qualitative analysis of audiotaped intervention sessions in one study provides valuable insights for subsequent research. The information gained can increase the consistency of intervention implementation in future RCTs, facilitate the translation of research into practice, and contribute to the knowledge base around nursing interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: National Cancer Institute, (Administrative Supplement to R01 CA64734).
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA QUALITATIVE COMPONENT OF A RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIALen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSchumacher, Karenen_US
dc.contributor.authorKoresawa, Setsukoen_US
dc.contributor.authorWest, Claudiaen_US
dc.contributor.authorDodd, Marylinen_US
dc.contributor.authorPaul, Stevenen_US
dc.contributor.authorMiaskowski, Christineen_US
dc.author.detailsKaren Schumacher, RN, PhD, Univesity of Nebraska Medical Center, College of Nursing, Omaha, Nebraska, USA; Setsuko Koresawa, RN, MS; Claudia West, RN, MS; Marylin Dodd, RN, PhD; Steven Paul, PhD; Christine Miaskowski, RN, PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164668-
dc.description.abstractTo describe a method of nesting qualitative research within a randomized clinical trial (RCT) using audiotaped intervention sessions as a source of data. Qualitative research may fruitfully be combined with intervention studies but few examples exist detailing methodological strategies for doing so. Audiotaped intervention sessions in a RCT provide extensive qualitative data on the implementation of the intervention that can be used for knowledge development about the intervention itself. As audiotaping increasingly is used as a strategy for monitoring treatment integrity for psychoeducational interventions, large qualitative databases will become available for substantive data analysis, as well as for quality assurance purposes. This presentation will provide an example of how one research team used those data. In a recently completed RCT of a nursing intervention called the PRO-SELF© Pain Control Program the teaching/coaching sessions with oncology outpatients experiencing pain from bone metastases and their family caregivers were audiotaped originally for quality assurance purposes. However, early reviews of the audiotapes revealed that they were a rich source of data about patients’ and family caregivers’ experiences with pain management. To mine this data source, we applied for and received an administrative supplement to the NCI funded study in order to transcribe the audiotapes and conduct a qualitative study. Our objectives were 1) to better understand the pain management difficulties patients and family caregivers brought to the interventionist’s attention, 2) to better understand patients for whom the intervention did not work, and 3) to describe how patients and family caregivers used specific pain management tools. We will describe the sampling strategies and analytic procedures for each objective and the way in which the qualitative results will be used in future RCTs. In large programs of research, interventions are developed and refined across multiple studies. Conducting a qualitative analysis of audiotaped intervention sessions in one study provides valuable insights for subsequent research. The information gained can increase the consistency of intervention implementation in future RCTs, facilitate the translation of research into practice, and contribute to the knowledge base around nursing interventions.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:04:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:04:51Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: National Cancer Institute, (Administrative Supplement to R01 CA64734).-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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