STRESS, TYPE AND SOURCE OF AND SATISFACTION WITH SOCIAL SUPPORT IN WOMEN WITH BREAST CANCER: EFFECTS ON FATIGUE, DEPRESSION, AND IMMUNE RESPONSE AND CHANGES OVER TIME

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164672
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
STRESS, TYPE AND SOURCE OF AND SATISFACTION WITH SOCIAL SUPPORT IN WOMEN WITH BREAST CANCER: EFFECTS ON FATIGUE, DEPRESSION, AND IMMUNE RESPONSE AND CHANGES OVER TIME
Author(s):
Von Ah, Diane
Author Details:
Diane Von Ah, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Abstract:
The diagnosis and treatment for breast cancer causes intense psychological stress. Perceived stress, in turn, may have a deleterious effect on fatigue, depression, and natural killer cell activity (NKCA). Social support, on the other hand, has been shown to have a direct and positive effect on health. However, little is known regarding the impact of stress, type and source of and satisfaction with social support on fatigue, depression, and immune response during the diagnosis and treatment of women with breast cancer. The purposes of this study were to examine: (1) the level of perceived stress, and type and source of and satisfaction with social support and their impact on fatigue, depression, and NKCA and (2) changes over time in all variables. The study was derived from Lazarus and Folkman’s cognitive appraisal theory. A convenience sample of 57 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer completed five questionnaires including: Impact of Event Scale, Norbeck Social Support Scale, Social Support Questionnaire-6, Piper Fatigue Scale-Revised, and the Depression subscale of the Profile of Mood States and provided a blood sample to determine NKCA. Questionnaires were collected: prior to adjuvant therapy (T1); 3 months later during adjuvant therapy (T2); and 6 months after baseline at the completion of adjuvant therapy (T3) and participants gave a blood sample at T1. Data were analyzed using hierarchical multiple regression controlling for age, stage of disease, and type of treatment, and repeated measures ANOVA. Stress had a deleterious effect on NKCA and resulted in higher levels of depression at T1, T2 and T3 and higher levels of fatigue at T2 and T3. On the other hand, high aid (tangible) support resulted in decreased fatigue at T1 and high satisfaction with social support led to decreased depression at T3. However, increases in total network support actually resulted in higher levels of fatigue at T1; indicating that not all support is beneficial. For changes over time, perceived stress, emotional, aid, and total network social support, fatigue, and depression decreased significantly over time, while satisfaction with social support remained stable. Findings from this study suggest that stress has a significant impact on health and that nurses must incorporate measures to assess and alleviate stress in their practice to improve outcomes for women with breast cancer.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: Support for this study was from the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation, Birmingham Affiliate, Birmingham, Alabama
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSTRESS, TYPE AND SOURCE OF AND SATISFACTION WITH SOCIAL SUPPORT IN WOMEN WITH BREAST CANCER: EFFECTS ON FATIGUE, DEPRESSION, AND IMMUNE RESPONSE AND CHANGES OVER TIMEen_GB
dc.contributor.authorVon Ah, Dianeen_US
dc.author.detailsDiane Von Ah, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164672-
dc.description.abstractThe diagnosis and treatment for breast cancer causes intense psychological stress. Perceived stress, in turn, may have a deleterious effect on fatigue, depression, and natural killer cell activity (NKCA). Social support, on the other hand, has been shown to have a direct and positive effect on health. However, little is known regarding the impact of stress, type and source of and satisfaction with social support on fatigue, depression, and immune response during the diagnosis and treatment of women with breast cancer. The purposes of this study were to examine: (1) the level of perceived stress, and type and source of and satisfaction with social support and their impact on fatigue, depression, and NKCA and (2) changes over time in all variables. The study was derived from Lazarus and Folkman’s cognitive appraisal theory. A convenience sample of 57 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer completed five questionnaires including: Impact of Event Scale, Norbeck Social Support Scale, Social Support Questionnaire-6, Piper Fatigue Scale-Revised, and the Depression subscale of the Profile of Mood States and provided a blood sample to determine NKCA. Questionnaires were collected: prior to adjuvant therapy (T1); 3 months later during adjuvant therapy (T2); and 6 months after baseline at the completion of adjuvant therapy (T3) and participants gave a blood sample at T1. Data were analyzed using hierarchical multiple regression controlling for age, stage of disease, and type of treatment, and repeated measures ANOVA. Stress had a deleterious effect on NKCA and resulted in higher levels of depression at T1, T2 and T3 and higher levels of fatigue at T2 and T3. On the other hand, high aid (tangible) support resulted in decreased fatigue at T1 and high satisfaction with social support led to decreased depression at T3. However, increases in total network support actually resulted in higher levels of fatigue at T1; indicating that not all support is beneficial. For changes over time, perceived stress, emotional, aid, and total network social support, fatigue, and depression decreased significantly over time, while satisfaction with social support remained stable. Findings from this study suggest that stress has a significant impact on health and that nurses must incorporate measures to assess and alleviate stress in their practice to improve outcomes for women with breast cancer.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:04:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:04:55Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: Support for this study was from the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation, Birmingham Affiliate, Birmingham, Alabama-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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