Symptoms, Self-Care and Quality of Life of Disadvantaged Chinese-Speaking Cancer Patients: A Pilot Study

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Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164673
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Symptoms, Self-Care and Quality of Life of Disadvantaged Chinese-Speaking Cancer Patients: A Pilot Study
Author(s):
Chou, F.Y.; M, Dodd; D, Abrams; G, Padilla
Author Details:
F.Y Chou, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA, Dodd, M; Abrams, D; Padilla, G
Abstract:
As the ethnic and cultural compositions of populations in the United States become more diverse, the attention to studying health care experiences in minority groups has been increasing. The impacts of cancer treatments on patients’ symptom management and quality of life had been documented in the literature, however, up to dates few studies examined symptom experience and quality of life in disadvantaged minority groups. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore and examine the symptom experience, self-care strategies, and quality of life among Chinese-speaking cancer immigrants/Americans during their outpatient chemotherapy. This presentation summarizes the preliminary results of the study. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: UCSF Symptom Management Model. Methods: A descriptive, longitudinal design was used. Chinese-speaking cancer patients were recruited during one chemotherapy cycle at a county medical center in Northern California. Participants were asked to fill out questionnaires of basic demographic data, Suinn-Lew Acculturation Scale, weekly Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale and Self-Care Diary for there weeks, and Multidimensional Quality of life Scale-Cancer numeric scale and Short-Form 36 at the start and the end of the cycle. Study instruments were translated into Chinese. Both Chinese and English versions of questionnaires were provided and participants could choose either version to complete. Data Analysis: Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the preliminary results. Findings and Implications: The mean age of the sample (N = 19) was 51.16 years old (SD = 8.65), and 68% were male. All of the participants were first generation immigrants with low level of acculturation (M = 1.40, SD = 0.35), and 63% of them do not speak or read English. In average, participants reported about 15 symptoms (range = 0-32) weekly. Hair loss, lack of energy, dry mouth, sleep difficulty, and loss of appetite were the symptoms frequently reported. In average about 2 self-care strategies per symptom (range = 0-5) were reported, but overall with low to moderate level of effectiveness. 20% of the sample listed Chinese medicine as other self-care strategy. Moderate levels of quality of life were also reported. Results suggested that symptom management and enhance self-care are imperative in providing quality cancer care in disadvantaged groups.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSymptoms, Self-Care and Quality of Life of Disadvantaged Chinese-Speaking Cancer Patients: A Pilot Studyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorChou, F.Y.en_US
dc.contributor.authorM, Dodden_US
dc.contributor.authorD, Abramsen_US
dc.contributor.authorG, Padillaen_US
dc.author.detailsF.Y Chou, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA, Dodd, M; Abrams, D; Padilla, Gen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164673-
dc.description.abstractAs the ethnic and cultural compositions of populations in the United States become more diverse, the attention to studying health care experiences in minority groups has been increasing. The impacts of cancer treatments on patients’ symptom management and quality of life had been documented in the literature, however, up to dates few studies examined symptom experience and quality of life in disadvantaged minority groups. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore and examine the symptom experience, self-care strategies, and quality of life among Chinese-speaking cancer immigrants/Americans during their outpatient chemotherapy. This presentation summarizes the preliminary results of the study. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: UCSF Symptom Management Model. Methods: A descriptive, longitudinal design was used. Chinese-speaking cancer patients were recruited during one chemotherapy cycle at a county medical center in Northern California. Participants were asked to fill out questionnaires of basic demographic data, Suinn-Lew Acculturation Scale, weekly Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale and Self-Care Diary for there weeks, and Multidimensional Quality of life Scale-Cancer numeric scale and Short-Form 36 at the start and the end of the cycle. Study instruments were translated into Chinese. Both Chinese and English versions of questionnaires were provided and participants could choose either version to complete. Data Analysis: Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the preliminary results. Findings and Implications: The mean age of the sample (N = 19) was 51.16 years old (SD = 8.65), and 68% were male. All of the participants were first generation immigrants with low level of acculturation (M = 1.40, SD = 0.35), and 63% of them do not speak or read English. In average, participants reported about 15 symptoms (range = 0-32) weekly. Hair loss, lack of energy, dry mouth, sleep difficulty, and loss of appetite were the symptoms frequently reported. In average about 2 self-care strategies per symptom (range = 0-5) were reported, but overall with low to moderate level of effectiveness. 20% of the sample listed Chinese medicine as other self-care strategy. Moderate levels of quality of life were also reported. Results suggested that symptom management and enhance self-care are imperative in providing quality cancer care in disadvantaged groups.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:04:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:04:56Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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