2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164674
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Validating Self-Regulation Theory in Lung Cancer
Author(s):
Goodell, T.
Author Details:
T, Goodell, Oregon Health & Sciences University, Portland, Oregon, USA
Abstract:
Lung cancer kills more people worldwide than breast and prostate cancer combined, yet less clinical research is devoted to it than to these other cancers. It is among the most highly symptomatic of cancers, often detected late into disease progression. Blame by others and guilt for smoking may play a role in the perceived stigma against people with lung cancer. This stigma may influence how people with lung cancer and health care providers view the illness (illness appraisal.) Effective symptom interventions are greatly needed for this population. Purpose: Self-regulation theory suggests that symptom distress is influenced by illness appraisal. Illness appraisal may contribute to symptom distress in people with lung cancer, but this relationship has not been explored. This relationship may suggest avenues for nurse-led symptom distress interventions that are cost-effective and entail minimal risk. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: This is the first study to explore self-regulation theory as a basis for interventions designed to modify illness appraisal and reduce symptom distress in people with NSCLC. Symptom distress is viewed as distinct from symptom frequency and intensity in self-regulation theory, consisting of subjective emotional responses to symptoms. Methods: The major objective was to explore relationships among selected components of illness appraisal (consequences, timeline, emotional representations, curability/controllability, and illness coherence) and symptom distress in outpatients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Thirty participants have completed three questionnaires: a demographic questionnaire, the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale and the Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised. Desired N is 50. Data Analysis: Preliminary analysis shows nine symptoms experienced by more than half the respondents: lack of energy, shortness of breath, cough, feeling drowsy, worrying, sexual problems, lack of appetite, feeling nervous and difficulty sleeping. Correlational analysis identified candidate variables for inclusion in a multiple regression model predicting symptom distress from the subset of high-frequency symptoms. Findings and Implications: Of the illness appraisal dimensions, consequences resulted in the greatest change in R-sq. in the final model, although it did not reach statistical significance. Analysis will be repeated when the final sample is obtained. If illness appraisal contributes to symptom distress, as posed by self-regulation theory, nurse-led interventions could be developed to relieve distress in this highly symptomatic population.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleValidating Self-Regulation Theory in Lung Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorGoodell, T.en_US
dc.author.detailsT, Goodell, Oregon Health & Sciences University, Portland, Oregon, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164674-
dc.description.abstractLung cancer kills more people worldwide than breast and prostate cancer combined, yet less clinical research is devoted to it than to these other cancers. It is among the most highly symptomatic of cancers, often detected late into disease progression. Blame by others and guilt for smoking may play a role in the perceived stigma against people with lung cancer. This stigma may influence how people with lung cancer and health care providers view the illness (illness appraisal.) Effective symptom interventions are greatly needed for this population. Purpose: Self-regulation theory suggests that symptom distress is influenced by illness appraisal. Illness appraisal may contribute to symptom distress in people with lung cancer, but this relationship has not been explored. This relationship may suggest avenues for nurse-led symptom distress interventions that are cost-effective and entail minimal risk. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: This is the first study to explore self-regulation theory as a basis for interventions designed to modify illness appraisal and reduce symptom distress in people with NSCLC. Symptom distress is viewed as distinct from symptom frequency and intensity in self-regulation theory, consisting of subjective emotional responses to symptoms. Methods: The major objective was to explore relationships among selected components of illness appraisal (consequences, timeline, emotional representations, curability/controllability, and illness coherence) and symptom distress in outpatients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Thirty participants have completed three questionnaires: a demographic questionnaire, the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale and the Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised. Desired N is 50. Data Analysis: Preliminary analysis shows nine symptoms experienced by more than half the respondents: lack of energy, shortness of breath, cough, feeling drowsy, worrying, sexual problems, lack of appetite, feeling nervous and difficulty sleeping. Correlational analysis identified candidate variables for inclusion in a multiple regression model predicting symptom distress from the subset of high-frequency symptoms. Findings and Implications: Of the illness appraisal dimensions, consequences resulted in the greatest change in R-sq. in the final model, although it did not reach statistical significance. Analysis will be repeated when the final sample is obtained. If illness appraisal contributes to symptom distress, as posed by self-regulation theory, nurse-led interventions could be developed to relieve distress in this highly symptomatic population.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:04:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:04:57Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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