Methods and Outcomes for Recruitment of Cases and Controls for a Brain Tumor Epidemiology Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164675
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Methods and Outcomes for Recruitment of Cases and Controls for a Brain Tumor Epidemiology Study
Author(s):
Lyons, P; Davis, F; Bigner, D; Friedman, H; McCarthy, B; Rauscher, G; Vick, N; Paleologos, N; Tourt-Uhlig, S; Lada, P
Author Details:
P Lyons, Duke University Medical Center, The Brain Tumor Center at Duke, Durham, North Carolina, USA; Davis, F; Bigner, D; Friedman, H; McCarthy, B; Rauscher, G; Vick, N; Paleologos, N; Tourt-Uhlig, S; Lada, P
Abstract:
Successful recruitment of eligible cases and controls in epidemiology studies is key to determining causative factors of gliomas. A subject who feels confident in the purpose of the study will more likely consent to participation and provide accurate lifestyle information. Purpose: This study examines the response rates to requests for interviews and biological specimens of cases and controls at the time of recruitment through study completion. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Based on Jean Watson's "Human Science and Human Care", nurse and client interactions will be studied with specific interest in the development of a helping/trusting relationship in order to assist in increasing subjects' response rates. Methods: This prospective study involves enrollment of patients with newly diagnosed gliomas, initiated in August, 2003. A research nurse assessed interest level, fully informed, and consented patients within two weeks of first neuro-oncology clinic encounter. Telephone and web-based surveys were presented as interview options due to the limitations involving cognitive impairment in this patient population. Recruitment of patients' siblings and friends as controls was initiated due to difficulty with obtaining a valid control group because of extensive referral patterns of specialty clinics. Demographic data and response rates for interviews and biological specimen sampling have been collected in both patient and control groups. Data Analysis: Frequency analyses of all demographic data and response rates for interviews and biological specimens will be performed. Exploratory analyses and Pearson's correlations will be used to assess the relationship between variables. To date, out of 487 eligible subjects, 441 subjects initially said they were interested in participating (90.5%). Out of 487 eligible subjects, 309 have consented (63.4%), 120 are pending consent (24.6%) and 12 have refused consent (2.5%). Best case consenting scenario would be 84% if all subjects pending consent choose to sign consent. Further descriptive statistics and analyses are pending. Findings and Implications: The development of helping/trusting relationships and the use of multiple interview options increases enrollment and continued participation through study completion. Enrollment of patients' siblings and friends as controls optimizes scientific validity for epidemiology studies. This study demonstrates that the use of multimedia options to maximize the enrollment in epidemiology studies for patients with gliomas is appropriate and can be translated into other vulnerable populations.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMethods and Outcomes for Recruitment of Cases and Controls for a Brain Tumor Epidemiology Studyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLyons, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorBigner, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorFriedman, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcCarthy, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorRauscher, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorVick, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorPaleologos, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorTourt-Uhlig, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorLada, Pen_US
dc.author.detailsP Lyons, Duke University Medical Center, The Brain Tumor Center at Duke, Durham, North Carolina, USA; Davis, F; Bigner, D; Friedman, H; McCarthy, B; Rauscher, G; Vick, N; Paleologos, N; Tourt-Uhlig, S; Lada, Pen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164675-
dc.description.abstractSuccessful recruitment of eligible cases and controls in epidemiology studies is key to determining causative factors of gliomas. A subject who feels confident in the purpose of the study will more likely consent to participation and provide accurate lifestyle information. Purpose: This study examines the response rates to requests for interviews and biological specimens of cases and controls at the time of recruitment through study completion. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Based on Jean Watson's "Human Science and Human Care", nurse and client interactions will be studied with specific interest in the development of a helping/trusting relationship in order to assist in increasing subjects' response rates. Methods: This prospective study involves enrollment of patients with newly diagnosed gliomas, initiated in August, 2003. A research nurse assessed interest level, fully informed, and consented patients within two weeks of first neuro-oncology clinic encounter. Telephone and web-based surveys were presented as interview options due to the limitations involving cognitive impairment in this patient population. Recruitment of patients' siblings and friends as controls was initiated due to difficulty with obtaining a valid control group because of extensive referral patterns of specialty clinics. Demographic data and response rates for interviews and biological specimen sampling have been collected in both patient and control groups. Data Analysis: Frequency analyses of all demographic data and response rates for interviews and biological specimens will be performed. Exploratory analyses and Pearson's correlations will be used to assess the relationship between variables. To date, out of 487 eligible subjects, 441 subjects initially said they were interested in participating (90.5%). Out of 487 eligible subjects, 309 have consented (63.4%), 120 are pending consent (24.6%) and 12 have refused consent (2.5%). Best case consenting scenario would be 84% if all subjects pending consent choose to sign consent. Further descriptive statistics and analyses are pending. Findings and Implications: The development of helping/trusting relationships and the use of multiple interview options increases enrollment and continued participation through study completion. Enrollment of patients' siblings and friends as controls optimizes scientific validity for epidemiology studies. This study demonstrates that the use of multimedia options to maximize the enrollment in epidemiology studies for patients with gliomas is appropriate and can be translated into other vulnerable populations.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:04:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:04:58Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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