2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164677
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Virtual Reality Intervention for Chemotherapy Symptoms
Author(s):
Schneider, S; Hood, L; Grant, M
Author Details:
S. Schneider, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA; L. Hood; M. Grant
Abstract:
Successful completion of chemotherapy offers a greater chance of tumor non-recurrence and long-term quality of life. However, many patients have difficulty adhering to the prescribed regimen because of related symptoms. Virtual reality (VR) provides a distracting, immersive environment, which blocks out competing stimuli, ameliorates chemotherapy symptoms, and thus, helps patients tolerate their chemotherapy regimen. Purpose: This study explored VR as a distraction intervention to relieve symptom distress in outpatients receiving chemotherapy and to determine the post-treatment effect on symptom distress after 48 hours. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Lazarus and Folkman’s Stress and Coping Model identifies interactive distraction as an emotion-focused coping strategy utilized by individuals experiencing a threatening situation. VR is an immersive and interactive intervention, which engages several senses simultaneously. The individual wears a headset that projects an image with the corresponding sounds of the environment. The sense of touch is involved through a computer mouse that allows image manipulation. Methods: A crossover design was used to determine whether VR was effective in reducing chemotherapy-related symptom distress in patients and whether the effects last for two days. 120 adults receiving chemotherapy for breast, colon, or lung cancer at Duke University Comprehensive Cancer Center were randomly assigned to receive VR during one chemotherapy treatment and no VR (control) during an alternate treatment. The Adapted Symptom Distress Scale-2, the Revised Piper Fatigue Scale and the State Anxiety Inventory measured aspects of symptom distress for two matched chemotherapy treatments. All instruments have demonstrated reliability and validity in this population. Data Analysis: To date 92 subjects have been enrolled, with preliminary results demonstrating positive outcomes following VR use. Patients had an altered perception of time (p<.001) when using the VR which validates the distracting capacity of the intervention. Paired t-tests (p<.05) will be used to test for differences in symptom distress following chemotherapy. Evaluation of the intervention indicated that patients thought the head mounted device was easy to use, they experienced no cybersickness, and > 80% would use VR again. Final results will be presented. Findings and Implications: Nursing interventions, such as VR, designed to manage chemotherapy-related symptom distress can help to improve quality of life and enhance chances for cure.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleVirtual Reality Intervention for Chemotherapy Symptomsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSchneider, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorHood, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorGrant, Men_US
dc.author.detailsS. Schneider, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA; L. Hood; M. Granten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164677-
dc.description.abstractSuccessful completion of chemotherapy offers a greater chance of tumor non-recurrence and long-term quality of life. However, many patients have difficulty adhering to the prescribed regimen because of related symptoms. Virtual reality (VR) provides a distracting, immersive environment, which blocks out competing stimuli, ameliorates chemotherapy symptoms, and thus, helps patients tolerate their chemotherapy regimen. Purpose: This study explored VR as a distraction intervention to relieve symptom distress in outpatients receiving chemotherapy and to determine the post-treatment effect on symptom distress after 48 hours. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Lazarus and Folkman&rsquo;s Stress and Coping Model identifies interactive distraction as an emotion-focused coping strategy utilized by individuals experiencing a threatening situation. VR is an immersive and interactive intervention, which engages several senses simultaneously. The individual wears a headset that projects an image with the corresponding sounds of the environment. The sense of touch is involved through a computer mouse that allows image manipulation. Methods: A crossover design was used to determine whether VR was effective in reducing chemotherapy-related symptom distress in patients and whether the effects last for two days. 120 adults receiving chemotherapy for breast, colon, or lung cancer at Duke University Comprehensive Cancer Center were randomly assigned to receive VR during one chemotherapy treatment and no VR (control) during an alternate treatment. The Adapted Symptom Distress Scale-2, the Revised Piper Fatigue Scale and the State Anxiety Inventory measured aspects of symptom distress for two matched chemotherapy treatments. All instruments have demonstrated reliability and validity in this population. Data Analysis: To date 92 subjects have been enrolled, with preliminary results demonstrating positive outcomes following VR use. Patients had an altered perception of time (p&lt;.001) when using the VR which validates the distracting capacity of the intervention. Paired t-tests (p&lt;.05) will be used to test for differences in symptom distress following chemotherapy. Evaluation of the intervention indicated that patients thought the head mounted device was easy to use, they experienced no cybersickness, and &gt; 80% would use VR again. Final results will be presented. Findings and Implications: Nursing interventions, such as VR, designed to manage chemotherapy-related symptom distress can help to improve quality of life and enhance chances for cure.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:05:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:05:00Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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