An Intervention to Influence Knowledge, Health Beliefs, and Intention to Screen in Persons at Increased Risk for Colon Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164678
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Intervention to Influence Knowledge, Health Beliefs, and Intention to Screen in Persons at Increased Risk for Colon Cancer
Author(s):
Zawacki-Seidl, K; Codori, AM
Author Details:
K Zawacki-Seidl, Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; AM Codori
Abstract:
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer death in the U.S., but it is preventable if found in the pre-malignant stage of polyps. Screening tools are effective, but less than half of Americans over age 50 have been screened according to recommendations, and screening habits in those at increased risk have not been consistently described. Purpose: The purpose of this project was to evaluate the effects of a study-developed, targeted intervention on knowledge level, health beliefs, and intention to screen in first-degree relatives (FDRs) of CRC patients. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The Preventive Health Model was used to guide this study. Theoretical models of health behavior maintain that health beliefs influence actual behaviors, such as screening. Therefore, influencing health beliefs should theoretically change health behavior and screening practices. Methods: This study used a randomized, repeated measures, factorial design with the following intervention groups: 1) control group, 2) targeted booklet group, 3) telephone informational session group, and 4) combined targeted booklet and telephone informational group. Measurement included nine knowledge-based questions, three visual analog scales, and the Rawl Scales for Perceived Susceptibility, Benefits, and Barriers. Data were collected at baseline and two weeks after intervention delivery. Ninety FDRs completed data collection. Data Analysis: Three separate repeated measures ANOVAs were conducted to evaluate the outcome variables of knowledge level, perceived risk, and belief in preventability. Fisher’s Exact test was used to compare intention to screen between groups. Findings and Implications: Participants who received the targeted intervention had significantly higher scores in knowledge (p=.007) and belief in preventability (p=.005) than control group participants at the 2-week follow-up. Of the participants who needed a colonoscopy within the next year, those who received the targeted intervention were more likely to state that they intended to undergo colonoscopy screening within the next year than participants in the control group who needed a colonoscopy (p=.004). Future studies should continue to examine the relationships between knowledge, health beliefs, intention to screen, and actual behavior as it relates to CRC screening.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: ONS Small Grant sponsored in part by Bristol-Myers Squibb Oncology.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Intervention to Influence Knowledge, Health Beliefs, and Intention to Screen in Persons at Increased Risk for Colon Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorZawacki-Seidl, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorCodori, AMen_US
dc.author.detailsK Zawacki-Seidl, Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; AM Codorien_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164678-
dc.description.abstractColorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer death in the U.S., but it is preventable if found in the pre-malignant stage of polyps. Screening tools are effective, but less than half of Americans over age 50 have been screened according to recommendations, and screening habits in those at increased risk have not been consistently described. Purpose: The purpose of this project was to evaluate the effects of a study-developed, targeted intervention on knowledge level, health beliefs, and intention to screen in first-degree relatives (FDRs) of CRC patients. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The Preventive Health Model was used to guide this study. Theoretical models of health behavior maintain that health beliefs influence actual behaviors, such as screening. Therefore, influencing health beliefs should theoretically change health behavior and screening practices. Methods: This study used a randomized, repeated measures, factorial design with the following intervention groups: 1) control group, 2) targeted booklet group, 3) telephone informational session group, and 4) combined targeted booklet and telephone informational group. Measurement included nine knowledge-based questions, three visual analog scales, and the Rawl Scales for Perceived Susceptibility, Benefits, and Barriers. Data were collected at baseline and two weeks after intervention delivery. Ninety FDRs completed data collection. Data Analysis: Three separate repeated measures ANOVAs were conducted to evaluate the outcome variables of knowledge level, perceived risk, and belief in preventability. Fisher’s Exact test was used to compare intention to screen between groups. Findings and Implications: Participants who received the targeted intervention had significantly higher scores in knowledge (p=.007) and belief in preventability (p=.005) than control group participants at the 2-week follow-up. Of the participants who needed a colonoscopy within the next year, those who received the targeted intervention were more likely to state that they intended to undergo colonoscopy screening within the next year than participants in the control group who needed a colonoscopy (p=.004). Future studies should continue to examine the relationships between knowledge, health beliefs, intention to screen, and actual behavior as it relates to CRC screening.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:05:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:05:01Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: ONS Small Grant sponsored in part by Bristol-Myers Squibb Oncology.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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