PREVALENCE AND PREDICTORS OF COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE THERAPIES USE BY WOMEN WITH ADVANCED BREAST CANCER

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164680
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PREVALENCE AND PREDICTORS OF COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE THERAPIES USE BY WOMEN WITH ADVANCED BREAST CANCER
Author(s):
Bauer-Wu, Susan; Gross, Qin Liu, Abigail
Author Details:
Susan Bauer-Wu, DNSc, RN, Director, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: sbauerwu@partners.org; Abigail Gross; Qin Liu
Abstract:
Topic: Complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapies use is increasingly common, particularly among cancer patients. Previous research has documented high CAM use in cancer patients primarily with early stages of disease. Information on CAM use in patients with metastatic cancer is limited, yet would be valuable in the care of these patients. Purpose: To evaluate the prevalence of CAM use over time and to examine relationships between the use of different CAM therapies and demographic characteristics among a sample of women living with metastatic breast cancer. Framework: No particular theoretical framework guided this study. Methods: This descriptive, longitudinal study of metastatic breast cancer patients (N=173) was a secondary analysis. All participants were receiving conventional cancer treatment. Mailed written surveys were completed at three time points over a period of six months, which assessed CAM use (specific therapies and amount of money spent monthly on nutritional or herbal supplements) and socio-demographic information. Statistical analyses included descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Findings: More than 90% of the sample used at least one type of CAM and 68% used two or more. The frequency of IT use did not change over six months. Three-fourths used prayer or other spiritual practice on a regular basis, one-third had seen a non-traditional healer in the last three months (massage therapist, herbalist/naturopath, Reiki/energy healer, and acupuncturist), and one-fifth practiced yoga and/or meditation. Two-thirds reported purchasing vitamins and one-third herbal products, and approximately $50 was the average monthly amount spent on these products. Statistically significant results (p< 0.02) indicate that younger, more educated participants were more likely were more likely to go to CAM practitioners (i.e. massage therapists, acupuncturists, or herbalists) and also more likely to practice meditation/yoga in an average week versus older participants with less education. Younger participants were also more likely to use herbal products as well as spend more money on vitamins and herbal products. Given the disease and treatment complexities associated with the management of young advanced breast cancer patients, coupled with the pervasive use of CAM in these patients, information related to CAM use in these patients is of utmost importance to oncology clinicians.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePREVALENCE AND PREDICTORS OF COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE THERAPIES USE BY WOMEN WITH ADVANCED BREAST CANCERen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBauer-Wu, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorGross, Qin Liu, Abigailen_US
dc.author.detailsSusan Bauer-Wu, DNSc, RN, Director, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: sbauerwu@partners.org; Abigail Gross; Qin Liuen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164680-
dc.description.abstractTopic: Complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapies use is increasingly common, particularly among cancer patients. Previous research has documented high CAM use in cancer patients primarily with early stages of disease. Information on CAM use in patients with metastatic cancer is limited, yet would be valuable in the care of these patients. Purpose: To evaluate the prevalence of CAM use over time and to examine relationships between the use of different CAM therapies and demographic characteristics among a sample of women living with metastatic breast cancer. Framework: No particular theoretical framework guided this study. Methods: This descriptive, longitudinal study of metastatic breast cancer patients (N=173) was a secondary analysis. All participants were receiving conventional cancer treatment. Mailed written surveys were completed at three time points over a period of six months, which assessed CAM use (specific therapies and amount of money spent monthly on nutritional or herbal supplements) and socio-demographic information. Statistical analyses included descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Findings: More than 90% of the sample used at least one type of CAM and 68% used two or more. The frequency of IT use did not change over six months. Three-fourths used prayer or other spiritual practice on a regular basis, one-third had seen a non-traditional healer in the last three months (massage therapist, herbalist/naturopath, Reiki/energy healer, and acupuncturist), and one-fifth practiced yoga and/or meditation. Two-thirds reported purchasing vitamins and one-third herbal products, and approximately $50 was the average monthly amount spent on these products. Statistically significant results (p&lt; 0.02) indicate that younger, more educated participants were more likely were more likely to go to CAM practitioners (i.e. massage therapists, acupuncturists, or herbalists) and also more likely to practice meditation/yoga in an average week versus older participants with less education. Younger participants were also more likely to use herbal products as well as spend more money on vitamins and herbal products. Given the disease and treatment complexities associated with the management of young advanced breast cancer patients, coupled with the pervasive use of CAM in these patients, information related to CAM use in these patients is of utmost importance to oncology clinicians.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:05:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:05:03Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationBoston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.