THERAPEUTIC ADMINISTRATION OF ORANGE TO RELIEVE DMSO-RELATED SYMPTOMS DURING AUTOLOGOUS PERIPHERAL BLOOD STEM CELL REINFUSIONS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164683
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
THERAPEUTIC ADMINISTRATION OF ORANGE TO RELIEVE DMSO-RELATED SYMPTOMS DURING AUTOLOGOUS PERIPHERAL BLOOD STEM CELL REINFUSIONS
Author(s):
Eisenberg, Seth; Potter, Pamela
Author Details:
Seth Eisenberg, RN, AND, OCN, Professional Practice Coordinator: Infusion Svc, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, Washington, USA, email: seisenbe@seattlecca.org; Pamela Potter
Abstract:
Topic: DMSO is commonly used as a preservative for autologous hematopoietic stem cells. During reinfusion, patients frequently experience throat discomfort, coughing and nausea or vomiting. Anecdotal experience suggests that using an orange to smell or taste during the reinfusion may alleviate symptoms in some patients. Literature reviews failed to produce any studies on the potential efficacy of orange for this application. Purpose: While limited in duration, symptoms associated with autologous reinfusions can cause significant patient distress. Coughing and choking increases anxiety that is often be heightened during this time-point in the transplant continuum. No specific medical interventions have reported efficacy for these symptoms, despite the administration of antiemetics and other premedications. Framework: In the same way that menthol cough drops stimulate the oral-nasal receptors to reduce symptoms of sinus congestion, it is postulated that orange or orange vapors might have a similar effect on the throat and oral-nasal cavity. Anecdotal reports suggest orange aroma may compete with the pungent odor of DMSO as it is exhaled, although this mechanism of action has not been proven. Methods: This is a pilot study of 60 patients receiving an autologous reinfusion in the SCCA Ambulatory clinic. Participants are randomized to one of three arms: Orange Intervention (OI), Orange Aromatherapy (OAI), or control (deep breathing). Control groups who receive more than three bags of cells are then crossed over to receive either the OI or OAI. All subjects are monitored for up to six bags of cells. At the completion of each bag, patients are asked to rate their degree (0-10) of throat "tickling" or discomfort, nausea, retching and urge to cough. All responses are documented using a laptop computer. Findings: This pilot study is currently in progress, with 25 of 60 patients accrued thus far. At completion, data will be analyzed to determine if either intervention is beneficial for reducing DMSO-related symptoms, and if one intervention is superior. This will be the first study with empiric evidence to support or disprove the use of oranges for ameliorating a significant discomfort associated with autologous reinfusions. These results may provide the foundation for further research in this area.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: Puget Sound Oncology Nursing Society.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTHERAPEUTIC ADMINISTRATION OF ORANGE TO RELIEVE DMSO-RELATED SYMPTOMS DURING AUTOLOGOUS PERIPHERAL BLOOD STEM CELL REINFUSIONSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEisenberg, Sethen_US
dc.contributor.authorPotter, Pamelaen_US
dc.author.detailsSeth Eisenberg, RN, AND, OCN, Professional Practice Coordinator: Infusion Svc, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, Washington, USA, email: seisenbe@seattlecca.org; Pamela Potteren_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164683-
dc.description.abstractTopic: DMSO is commonly used as a preservative for autologous hematopoietic stem cells. During reinfusion, patients frequently experience throat discomfort, coughing and nausea or vomiting. Anecdotal experience suggests that using an orange to smell or taste during the reinfusion may alleviate symptoms in some patients. Literature reviews failed to produce any studies on the potential efficacy of orange for this application. Purpose: While limited in duration, symptoms associated with autologous reinfusions can cause significant patient distress. Coughing and choking increases anxiety that is often be heightened during this time-point in the transplant continuum. No specific medical interventions have reported efficacy for these symptoms, despite the administration of antiemetics and other premedications. Framework: In the same way that menthol cough drops stimulate the oral-nasal receptors to reduce symptoms of sinus congestion, it is postulated that orange or orange vapors might have a similar effect on the throat and oral-nasal cavity. Anecdotal reports suggest orange aroma may compete with the pungent odor of DMSO as it is exhaled, although this mechanism of action has not been proven. Methods: This is a pilot study of 60 patients receiving an autologous reinfusion in the SCCA Ambulatory clinic. Participants are randomized to one of three arms: Orange Intervention (OI), Orange Aromatherapy (OAI), or control (deep breathing). Control groups who receive more than three bags of cells are then crossed over to receive either the OI or OAI. All subjects are monitored for up to six bags of cells. At the completion of each bag, patients are asked to rate their degree (0-10) of throat "tickling" or discomfort, nausea, retching and urge to cough. All responses are documented using a laptop computer. Findings: This pilot study is currently in progress, with 25 of 60 patients accrued thus far. At completion, data will be analyzed to determine if either intervention is beneficial for reducing DMSO-related symptoms, and if one intervention is superior. This will be the first study with empiric evidence to support or disprove the use of oranges for ameliorating a significant discomfort associated with autologous reinfusions. These results may provide the foundation for further research in this area.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:05:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:05:06Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationBoston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: Puget Sound Oncology Nursing Society.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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