QUALITY OF LIFE OF BREAST CANCER SURVIVORS: COMPARISONS REGARDING THE GENERAL POPULATION, ETHNICITY, AND URBAN VS. SUBURBAN NEIGHBORHOODS.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164684
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
QUALITY OF LIFE OF BREAST CANCER SURVIVORS: COMPARISONS REGARDING THE GENERAL POPULATION, ETHNICITY, AND URBAN VS. SUBURBAN NEIGHBORHOODS.
Author(s):
Ferrans, Carol; Hacker, Eileen; Masino, Karen; Dobogai, Lisa; Mickle, Marcia
Author Details:
Carol Ferrans, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA, email: cferrans@uic.edu; Eileen Hacker; Karen Masin; Lisa Dobogai; Marcia Mickle
Abstract:
Topic: The majority of women diagnosed with breast cancer will become long-term survivors. To better develop health care services to meet their needs, we need to understand the differences in quality of life (QOL) among various groups of cancer survivors. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the QOL of long-term breast cancer survivors with women from the general population, and to examine the effect of ethnicity and location of residence (urban vs. suburban). Framework: The Ferrans (1996) conceptual model of quality of life guided this study. Methods: Data were collected by mailing questionnaires to participants' homes. All cancer survivors (n = 498) had completed treatment at least 12 months before participating in the study. Cancer survivor data were compared with questionnaires completed by women from the general population (n = 267). Findings: Cancer survivors were found to have significantly better QOL than women in the general population. QOL was better for cancer survivors overall, as well as in four life domains: health and functioning, psychological/spiritual, social and economic, and family. In their qualitative responses, cancer survivors reported positive changes in their lives as a result of their experience with cancer, contributing to improved QOL. Examination of the cancer survivor data showed that those who lived in urban neighborhoods had a significantly lower QOL than those who living in suburban areas. This was the case even though the urban group was significantly younger. This was found for both Caucasians and African Americans, demonstrating that living environment and socioeconomic status had a greater effect on QOL than ethnicity. In fact, the Caucasian women living in urban neighborhoods had a lower QOL than the African Americans in similar neighborhoods. Greater depression and social isolation may have contributed to the poorer QOL of the urban Caucasian group. The findings demonstrated that the cancer survivors living in urban neighborhoods had a greater need for supportive services than those in suburban areas. The results of this study can be used to help identify differences in needs for breast cancer survivors, particularly those in urban areas.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQUALITY OF LIFE OF BREAST CANCER SURVIVORS: COMPARISONS REGARDING THE GENERAL POPULATION, ETHNICITY, AND URBAN VS. SUBURBAN NEIGHBORHOODS.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorFerrans, Carolen_US
dc.contributor.authorHacker, Eileenen_US
dc.contributor.authorMasino, Karenen_US
dc.contributor.authorDobogai, Lisaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMickle, Marciaen_US
dc.author.detailsCarol Ferrans, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA, email: cferrans@uic.edu; Eileen Hacker; Karen Masin; Lisa Dobogai; Marcia Mickleen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164684-
dc.description.abstractTopic: The majority of women diagnosed with breast cancer will become long-term survivors. To better develop health care services to meet their needs, we need to understand the differences in quality of life (QOL) among various groups of cancer survivors. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the QOL of long-term breast cancer survivors with women from the general population, and to examine the effect of ethnicity and location of residence (urban vs. suburban). Framework: The Ferrans (1996) conceptual model of quality of life guided this study. Methods: Data were collected by mailing questionnaires to participants' homes. All cancer survivors (n = 498) had completed treatment at least 12 months before participating in the study. Cancer survivor data were compared with questionnaires completed by women from the general population (n = 267). Findings: Cancer survivors were found to have significantly better QOL than women in the general population. QOL was better for cancer survivors overall, as well as in four life domains: health and functioning, psychological/spiritual, social and economic, and family. In their qualitative responses, cancer survivors reported positive changes in their lives as a result of their experience with cancer, contributing to improved QOL. Examination of the cancer survivor data showed that those who lived in urban neighborhoods had a significantly lower QOL than those who living in suburban areas. This was the case even though the urban group was significantly younger. This was found for both Caucasians and African Americans, demonstrating that living environment and socioeconomic status had a greater effect on QOL than ethnicity. In fact, the Caucasian women living in urban neighborhoods had a lower QOL than the African Americans in similar neighborhoods. Greater depression and social isolation may have contributed to the poorer QOL of the urban Caucasian group. The findings demonstrated that the cancer survivors living in urban neighborhoods had a greater need for supportive services than those in suburban areas. The results of this study can be used to help identify differences in needs for breast cancer survivors, particularly those in urban areas.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:05:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:05:07Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationBoston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.