SYPMTOM CONCERNS AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN BREAST AND PROSTATE CANCER SURVIVORS RECEIVING HORMONAL AGENTS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164686
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
SYPMTOM CONCERNS AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN BREAST AND PROSTATE CANCER SURVIVORS RECEIVING HORMONAL AGENTS
Author(s):
Juarez, Gloria; Ferrell, Betty; Twardowski, Przemyslaw; Sun, Virginia; Uman, Gwen
Author Details:
Gloria Juarez, RN, PhD, Assistant Research Scientist, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California, USA, email: gjuarez@coh.org; Betty Ferrell; Przemyslaw Twardowski; Virginia Sun; Gwen Uman
Abstract:
Topic: This research addresses a priority topic identified by ONS of the understudied hormonal disturbances and the impact on quality life. Purpose: The aim of this study is to describe the patient's perspective of having multiple symptoms associated with hormonal cancer treatment and the impact of these symptoms on quality of life (QOL). Framework: A QOL model (Ferrell and Grant) formed the theoretical underpinnings for this study. Methods: This pilot descriptive longitudinal design evaluated the impact of hormonal therapy (HT) at 3 points in time on 15 patients diagnosed with stage I, III or III breast (7 subjects) or prostate cancer (8 subjects). Descriptive and non parametric statistics were used. At least 50% of the subjects reported problems with sexual interest or activity, pain, worrying, or lack of energy prior to hormone therapy (HT). After one month of HT over 50% of the subjects reported hot flashes (93.3%), lack of energy (73.3%, up from 50% before therapy), pain, and sweats. After four months of HT, over 50% of the subjects reported hot flashes (86.7%), lack of energy, sweats, problems with sexual interest or activity, pain, and worrying. Prior to hormonal therapy overall QOL was 7.21 (0 = good to 10 = worst). No significant changes in QOL were reported at 1 month and 4 months post HT (6.70 and 6.61, respectively). The physical domain subscale showed the worst outcomes at the 3 points in time. Findings: Patients reported multiple distressing symptoms related to symptom severity and limitations. Assessment of multiple symptoms is recommended and the impact of these symptoms on QOL should be evaluated. The data demonstrated the need for further research, assessment of symptoms, and intervention across each of the quality-of-life domains. The multidimensional needs of breast and prostate cancer survivors emphasize the need for interdisciplinary collaboration.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: AMGEN.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSYPMTOM CONCERNS AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN BREAST AND PROSTATE CANCER SURVIVORS RECEIVING HORMONAL AGENTSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJuarez, Gloriaen_US
dc.contributor.authorFerrell, Bettyen_US
dc.contributor.authorTwardowski, Przemyslawen_US
dc.contributor.authorSun, Virginiaen_US
dc.contributor.authorUman, Gwenen_US
dc.author.detailsGloria Juarez, RN, PhD, Assistant Research Scientist, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California, USA, email: gjuarez@coh.org; Betty Ferrell; Przemyslaw Twardowski; Virginia Sun; Gwen Umanen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164686-
dc.description.abstractTopic: This research addresses a priority topic identified by ONS of the understudied hormonal disturbances and the impact on quality life. Purpose: The aim of this study is to describe the patient's perspective of having multiple symptoms associated with hormonal cancer treatment and the impact of these symptoms on quality of life (QOL). Framework: A QOL model (Ferrell and Grant) formed the theoretical underpinnings for this study. Methods: This pilot descriptive longitudinal design evaluated the impact of hormonal therapy (HT) at 3 points in time on 15 patients diagnosed with stage I, III or III breast (7 subjects) or prostate cancer (8 subjects). Descriptive and non parametric statistics were used. At least 50% of the subjects reported problems with sexual interest or activity, pain, worrying, or lack of energy prior to hormone therapy (HT). After one month of HT over 50% of the subjects reported hot flashes (93.3%), lack of energy (73.3%, up from 50% before therapy), pain, and sweats. After four months of HT, over 50% of the subjects reported hot flashes (86.7%), lack of energy, sweats, problems with sexual interest or activity, pain, and worrying. Prior to hormonal therapy overall QOL was 7.21 (0 = good to 10 = worst). No significant changes in QOL were reported at 1 month and 4 months post HT (6.70 and 6.61, respectively). The physical domain subscale showed the worst outcomes at the 3 points in time. Findings: Patients reported multiple distressing symptoms related to symptom severity and limitations. Assessment of multiple symptoms is recommended and the impact of these symptoms on QOL should be evaluated. The data demonstrated the need for further research, assessment of symptoms, and intervention across each of the quality-of-life domains. The multidimensional needs of breast and prostate cancer survivors emphasize the need for interdisciplinary collaboration.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:05:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:05:09Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationBoston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: AMGEN.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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