A SURVEY OF PERCEPTIONS OF PATIENT SATISFACTION WITH PAIN CARE ON A GENERAL ONCOLOGY UNIT

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164691
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A SURVEY OF PERCEPTIONS OF PATIENT SATISFACTION WITH PAIN CARE ON A GENERAL ONCOLOGY UNIT
Author(s):
Mcgettigan, Suzanne; Sullivan, Mauri; Espeleta, Jose; McMenamin, Erin; Polomano, Rosemary
Author Details:
Suzanne Mcgettigan, MSN, CRNP, AOCN, Nurse Practitioner, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: suzanne.mcgettigan@uphs.upenn.edu; Mauri Sullivan; Jose Espeleta; Erin McMenamin; Rosemary Polomano
Abstract:
Topic: Post-discharge patient satisfaction surveys generally include global indicators of pain management but these rarely provide specific information about patients' levels of pain and perceptions of pain care. Purpose: The purpose of this analysis was to examine relationships of pain and satisfaction outcomes and to identify predictors of satisfaction with pain care. Framework: An outcomes research framework guided this investigation. Methods: A multidisciplinary team of investigators adapted and tested a pre-existing postoperative pain satisfaction survey for general medicine and oncology service patients (N=223). Reliability and validity were established for an 18-item survey that generated 4 subscales confirmed by factor analysis. Six items measure dimensions of pain intensity. Seven questions address satisfaction with care; additional items for helpfulness of analgesics, wait times and overall pain control were included. Survey forms were distributed to patients on a general medical oncology unit oncology at the time of discharge over 9 months. Descriptive and correlation statistics, linear regression analyses, and nonparametric tests were used for data analyses. Findings: The sample consisted of 88 medical oncology patients (mean age 52.8 +/- 14.6 yrs; 49.3% males; median length of hospitalization = 5 days). Acceptable reliability was evident for all 4 subscales (Cronbach's alphas .6 to .84). Satisfaction with pain relief was highly correlated to satisfaction with RN/MD pain treatment (rho = 0.67, P<.0.001) and concern (0.70, P<0.001). Higher "worst pain", and poorer perceptions of RN/MD concern and helpfulness of information predicted a "Tendency Toward Dissatisfaction" (P<0.001), while age and gender had no effect. Older age and less dissatisfaction with hospital care were associated with better "General Satisfaction" (P<0.001). Less "worst pain" and helpfulness of information in controlling pain were positively related to staff "Responsiveness" (P<001). No significant difference was observed for the "Pain Intensity" subscale between patients experiencing chronic cancer-related pain vs. acute pain. Routine assessments of pain and effectiveness of strategies to improve pain outcomes can provide useful information about pain experiences during hospitalization. Control of episodes of increased pain, staff expressions of concern about pain, and patient teaching on ways to control pain can make a difference in improving patients' perceptions of satisfaction with their pain care.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA SURVEY OF PERCEPTIONS OF PATIENT SATISFACTION WITH PAIN CARE ON A GENERAL ONCOLOGY UNITen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcgettigan, Suzanneen_US
dc.contributor.authorSullivan, Maurien_US
dc.contributor.authorEspeleta, Joseen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcMenamin, Erinen_US
dc.contributor.authorPolomano, Rosemaryen_US
dc.author.detailsSuzanne Mcgettigan, MSN, CRNP, AOCN, Nurse Practitioner, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: suzanne.mcgettigan@uphs.upenn.edu; Mauri Sullivan; Jose Espeleta; Erin McMenamin; Rosemary Polomanoen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164691-
dc.description.abstractTopic: Post-discharge patient satisfaction surveys generally include global indicators of pain management but these rarely provide specific information about patients' levels of pain and perceptions of pain care. Purpose: The purpose of this analysis was to examine relationships of pain and satisfaction outcomes and to identify predictors of satisfaction with pain care. Framework: An outcomes research framework guided this investigation. Methods: A multidisciplinary team of investigators adapted and tested a pre-existing postoperative pain satisfaction survey for general medicine and oncology service patients (N=223). Reliability and validity were established for an 18-item survey that generated 4 subscales confirmed by factor analysis. Six items measure dimensions of pain intensity. Seven questions address satisfaction with care; additional items for helpfulness of analgesics, wait times and overall pain control were included. Survey forms were distributed to patients on a general medical oncology unit oncology at the time of discharge over 9 months. Descriptive and correlation statistics, linear regression analyses, and nonparametric tests were used for data analyses. Findings: The sample consisted of 88 medical oncology patients (mean age 52.8 +/- 14.6 yrs; 49.3% males; median length of hospitalization = 5 days). Acceptable reliability was evident for all 4 subscales (Cronbach's alphas .6 to .84). Satisfaction with pain relief was highly correlated to satisfaction with RN/MD pain treatment (rho = 0.67, P&lt;.0.001) and concern (0.70, P&lt;0.001). Higher &quot;worst pain&quot;, and poorer perceptions of RN/MD concern and helpfulness of information predicted a &quot;Tendency Toward Dissatisfaction&quot; (P&lt;0.001), while age and gender had no effect. Older age and less dissatisfaction with hospital care were associated with better &quot;General Satisfaction&quot; (P&lt;0.001). Less &quot;worst pain&quot; and helpfulness of information in controlling pain were positively related to staff &quot;Responsiveness&quot; (P&lt;001). No significant difference was observed for the &quot;Pain Intensity&quot; subscale between patients experiencing chronic cancer-related pain vs. acute pain. Routine assessments of pain and effectiveness of strategies to improve pain outcomes can provide useful information about pain experiences during hospitalization. Control of episodes of increased pain, staff expressions of concern about pain, and patient teaching on ways to control pain can make a difference in improving patients' perceptions of satisfaction with their pain care.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:05:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:05:14Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationBoston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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