2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164692
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
LIVE ITEM TECHNIQUE (LIITE) IN LONGITUDINAL QUALITY OF LIFE CANCER TRIALS
Author(s):
McNees, Patrick; Hassey-Dow, Karen; Wochna-Loerzel, Victoria
Author Details:
Patrick McNees, PhD, CEO / Chief Scientist, Applied Health Science, Inc, Orlando, Florida, USA, email: pmcnees@mail.ucf.edu; Karen Hassey-Dow; Victoria Wochna-Loerzel
Abstract:
Topic: Quality of Life (QoL) research remains a vital investigative area for cancer researchers and is the highest ranked priority among the general ONS membership. Multiple QoL instruments are often used in longitudinal clinical trials. Unfortunately, such instruments frequently include specific items that are insensitive measures for proposed interventions or target populations. Resulting data may contribute to difficulties in detecting effects and patterns that are clinically important and otherwise statistically significant. Purpose: An alternative technique (LIITE) that identifies highly sensitive items among instruments is presented. The research question was: does the utilization of the LIITE technique result in the detection of significant effects compared to situations where utilization of all data does not detect such effects. Framework: Chaos theory provides the theoretical underpinnings for identifying salient data element patterns. Methods: LIITE was developed and tested in a two-group Breast Cancer Education Intervention QoL trial (n=255). Instruments included the Brief Pain Inventory, Profile of Mood States and QoL-Cancer Survivors; totaling 98 items. We calculated and summed absolute change scores and determined item rankings. Thirty-six items common to both Experimental (EG) and Wait Control (WC) groups accounted for 50% of total change. Twelve items contributed to 50% of the variance for either EG or WC. When combined, the total number of items increased to 48 and raised the percentage of variance accounted for to 63%. Between and within group analyses were performed at 3 and 6 months follow-up using the full data set and LIITE scores. Findings: At 3 months follow up, the results were equivocal regardless of which data set was analyzed. However, at 6 months LIITE identified continued improvement in the EG that would have been obscured if the full data set was used. Additionally, LIITE detected significant change in the WC after receiving the intervention at month 6 that was undetected when all items were included. LIITE may have utility in increasing data sensitivity in longitudinal QoL cancer trials. If future research confirms the efficacy of LIITE, smaller sample sizes may be indicated. LIITE may also be an important tool for efficient data mining in broad data sets, thus facilitating oncology human intervention research.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLIVE ITEM TECHNIQUE (LIITE) IN LONGITUDINAL QUALITY OF LIFE CANCER TRIALSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcNees, Patricken_US
dc.contributor.authorHassey-Dow, Karenen_US
dc.contributor.authorWochna-Loerzel, Victoriaen_US
dc.author.detailsPatrick McNees, PhD, CEO / Chief Scientist, Applied Health Science, Inc, Orlando, Florida, USA, email: pmcnees@mail.ucf.edu; Karen Hassey-Dow; Victoria Wochna-Loerzelen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164692-
dc.description.abstractTopic: Quality of Life (QoL) research remains a vital investigative area for cancer researchers and is the highest ranked priority among the general ONS membership. Multiple QoL instruments are often used in longitudinal clinical trials. Unfortunately, such instruments frequently include specific items that are insensitive measures for proposed interventions or target populations. Resulting data may contribute to difficulties in detecting effects and patterns that are clinically important and otherwise statistically significant. Purpose: An alternative technique (LIITE) that identifies highly sensitive items among instruments is presented. The research question was: does the utilization of the LIITE technique result in the detection of significant effects compared to situations where utilization of all data does not detect such effects. Framework: Chaos theory provides the theoretical underpinnings for identifying salient data element patterns. Methods: LIITE was developed and tested in a two-group Breast Cancer Education Intervention QoL trial (n=255). Instruments included the Brief Pain Inventory, Profile of Mood States and QoL-Cancer Survivors; totaling 98 items. We calculated and summed absolute change scores and determined item rankings. Thirty-six items common to both Experimental (EG) and Wait Control (WC) groups accounted for 50% of total change. Twelve items contributed to 50% of the variance for either EG or WC. When combined, the total number of items increased to 48 and raised the percentage of variance accounted for to 63%. Between and within group analyses were performed at 3 and 6 months follow-up using the full data set and LIITE scores. Findings: At 3 months follow up, the results were equivocal regardless of which data set was analyzed. However, at 6 months LIITE identified continued improvement in the EG that would have been obscured if the full data set was used. Additionally, LIITE detected significant change in the WC after receiving the intervention at month 6 that was undetected when all items were included. LIITE may have utility in increasing data sensitivity in longitudinal QoL cancer trials. If future research confirms the efficacy of LIITE, smaller sample sizes may be indicated. LIITE may also be an important tool for efficient data mining in broad data sets, thus facilitating oncology human intervention research.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:05:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:05:15Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationBoston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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