EFFECT OF AN INDIVIDUALIZED SYMPTOM EDUCATION PROGRAM ON THE SYMPTOM DISTRESS OF WOMEN RECEIVING RADIATION THERAPY FOR GYNECOLOGICAL CANCERS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164694
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
EFFECT OF AN INDIVIDUALIZED SYMPTOM EDUCATION PROGRAM ON THE SYMPTOM DISTRESS OF WOMEN RECEIVING RADIATION THERAPY FOR GYNECOLOGICAL CANCERS
Author(s):
Velji, Karima; Watt-Watson, Judy; Sidani, Souraya; Stevens, Bonnie; Degner, Lesley; Pathak, Eva; Fitzgerald, Barbara; Mulcahy, Virginia
Author Details:
Karima Velji, RN, AOCN, BSCN, MSC, Vice President Patient Care & Chief Nursing Executive, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, email: velji.karima@torontorehab.on.ca; Judy Watt-Watson; Souraya Sidani; Bonnie Stevens; Lesley Degner; Eva Pathak; Barbara Fitzgerald; Virginia Mulcahy
Abstract:
Topic: Women who receive radiation therapy for gynecological cancers experience a number of concurrent symptoms, including fatigue, pain, nausea, pelvic symptoms, and mood disturbance. Patients with cancer who experience concurrent symptoms experience considerable amount of distress related to their symptoms unmanaged symptoms have a negative impact on all the dimensions of quality of life. Individualized symptom education interventions have been demonstrated to be effective in reducing symptoms in patients with other types of cancer. However, no studies have been found evaluating these interventions in women with gynecological cancers. Purpose: Primary research question. What are the short (at program completion) and long term effects (3-months later) of an Individualized Symptom Education Program (ISEP), as compared to usual care alone, on the symptom distress of women receiving pelvic radiation therapy for gynecological cancer? Secondary questions - What are the short and long term effects of ISEP, as compared to usual care alone, on the symptom experience of fatigue, pain, nausea, pelvic symptoms and mood disturbance? Framework: Adapted from Dodd et al. (2001) Symptom Management Model Methods: A two-group randomized controlled trial with repeated measures design. 144 women from large gynecology oncology programs of two teaching hospitals were randomly allocated to either: a) 6-session ISEP group (intervention) or b) usual care group (standard care). An individualized education program based on published (National Cancer Care Network [NCCN], 2001) evidence-based guidelines for symptom management was provided to women at the initiation of radiation therapy and weekly during radiation treatment for a total of six sessions. Outcomes were measured at baseline, program completion, and at 3-months following program completion. Mixed modeling statistical analyses were used to evaluate group and time effects. Findings: Participants in the intervention group showed significant decrease in symptom distress scores at the end of the intervention compared to women who received usual care (p=0.039). Expectedly, both groups experienced worsening of symptoms over the course of radiation therapy. However, women in the ISEP group had less worsening in symptom distress, pain, fatigue, and nausea at the end of radiation treatment.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: National Cancer Institute of Canada funded this study.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEFFECT OF AN INDIVIDUALIZED SYMPTOM EDUCATION PROGRAM ON THE SYMPTOM DISTRESS OF WOMEN RECEIVING RADIATION THERAPY FOR GYNECOLOGICAL CANCERSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorVelji, Karimaen_US
dc.contributor.authorWatt-Watson, Judyen_US
dc.contributor.authorSidani, Sourayaen_US
dc.contributor.authorStevens, Bonnieen_US
dc.contributor.authorDegner, Lesleyen_US
dc.contributor.authorPathak, Evaen_US
dc.contributor.authorFitzgerald, Barbaraen_US
dc.contributor.authorMulcahy, Virginiaen_US
dc.author.detailsKarima Velji, RN, AOCN, BSCN, MSC, Vice President Patient Care & Chief Nursing Executive, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, email: velji.karima@torontorehab.on.ca; Judy Watt-Watson; Souraya Sidani; Bonnie Stevens; Lesley Degner; Eva Pathak; Barbara Fitzgerald; Virginia Mulcahyen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164694-
dc.description.abstractTopic: Women who receive radiation therapy for gynecological cancers experience a number of concurrent symptoms, including fatigue, pain, nausea, pelvic symptoms, and mood disturbance. Patients with cancer who experience concurrent symptoms experience considerable amount of distress related to their symptoms unmanaged symptoms have a negative impact on all the dimensions of quality of life. Individualized symptom education interventions have been demonstrated to be effective in reducing symptoms in patients with other types of cancer. However, no studies have been found evaluating these interventions in women with gynecological cancers. Purpose: Primary research question. What are the short (at program completion) and long term effects (3-months later) of an Individualized Symptom Education Program (ISEP), as compared to usual care alone, on the symptom distress of women receiving pelvic radiation therapy for gynecological cancer? Secondary questions - What are the short and long term effects of ISEP, as compared to usual care alone, on the symptom experience of fatigue, pain, nausea, pelvic symptoms and mood disturbance? Framework: Adapted from Dodd et al. (2001) Symptom Management Model Methods: A two-group randomized controlled trial with repeated measures design. 144 women from large gynecology oncology programs of two teaching hospitals were randomly allocated to either: a) 6-session ISEP group (intervention) or b) usual care group (standard care). An individualized education program based on published (National Cancer Care Network [NCCN], 2001) evidence-based guidelines for symptom management was provided to women at the initiation of radiation therapy and weekly during radiation treatment for a total of six sessions. Outcomes were measured at baseline, program completion, and at 3-months following program completion. Mixed modeling statistical analyses were used to evaluate group and time effects. Findings: Participants in the intervention group showed significant decrease in symptom distress scores at the end of the intervention compared to women who received usual care (p=0.039). Expectedly, both groups experienced worsening of symptoms over the course of radiation therapy. However, women in the ISEP group had less worsening in symptom distress, pain, fatigue, and nausea at the end of radiation treatment.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:05:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:05:18Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationBoston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: National Cancer Institute of Canada funded this study.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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