2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164697
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
MAKING CHANGES: MEETING KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCY NEEDS OF PEDIATRIC NURSES
Author(s):
Carroll, Ellen; Woolery, Myra
Author Details:
Ellen Carroll, BSN RN, Clinical Manager, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA, email: ecarroll@mail.nih.gov; Myra Woolery, MN, RN, CPON
Abstract:
The integration of nurses with a variety of expertise from two separate inpatient units into a combined 25 bed pediatric unit poses many challenges and can be anxiety provoking for some staff. One pediatric unit specialized in the care of hematology/oncology/transplant patients as well as patients with a variety of immune deficiencies; while the second unit cared mainly for patients with chronic pediatric conditions/diseases (i.e. endocrine, neurological, and genetic). Assessment of knowledge related to disease processes and treatment, critical thinking skills, and competencies need to be part of the initial planning phase. The purpose of this project was to develop a plan for the transition to a new combined unit and an ongoing evaluation of the integration. A carefully constructed educational program that includes didactic learning, skill validation through return demonstration, and clinical experiences, assists in building new skills and confidence. An initial educational program developed by the nurse manager, CNS, and senior staff included: in-house educational programs (i.e. oncology and endocrine courses), in-services highlighting disease process/treatments; review of existing and new protocols; and cross training which was accomplished by pairing staff from both units. After initial training, staff demonstrated basic knowledge. Over time competency proficiency has increased. A framework for an annual validation program was developed which included didactic assessment, skill demonstration, and critical thinking evaluation using disease-specific case scenarios. Ongoing annual assessments have revealed increase familiarity with the diverse population and treatment protocols. Staff verbalized less anxiety when caring for a previously unfamiliar population. During the integration phase, it is critical to ensure adequate staffing be maintained to continue ongoing training necessary for a successful transition. Consideration of staffing patterns should include an assessment of skill mix as staff increase their comfort level with the diverse population and proficiency with new competencies. Ongoing assessments provide a mechanism for determining additional educational and clinical experiences needed to keep staff current with the needs of the various populations. One of the many challenges is maintaining competencies in low frequency and high risk activities. The plan developed for the transition has been incorporated into our orientation program and annual revalidation program.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMAKING CHANGES: MEETING KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCY NEEDS OF PEDIATRIC NURSESen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCarroll, Ellenen_US
dc.contributor.authorWoolery, Myraen_US
dc.author.detailsEllen Carroll, BSN RN, Clinical Manager, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA, email: ecarroll@mail.nih.gov; Myra Woolery, MN, RN, CPONen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164697-
dc.description.abstractThe integration of nurses with a variety of expertise from two separate inpatient units into a combined 25 bed pediatric unit poses many challenges and can be anxiety provoking for some staff. One pediatric unit specialized in the care of hematology/oncology/transplant patients as well as patients with a variety of immune deficiencies; while the second unit cared mainly for patients with chronic pediatric conditions/diseases (i.e. endocrine, neurological, and genetic). Assessment of knowledge related to disease processes and treatment, critical thinking skills, and competencies need to be part of the initial planning phase. The purpose of this project was to develop a plan for the transition to a new combined unit and an ongoing evaluation of the integration. A carefully constructed educational program that includes didactic learning, skill validation through return demonstration, and clinical experiences, assists in building new skills and confidence. An initial educational program developed by the nurse manager, CNS, and senior staff included: in-house educational programs (i.e. oncology and endocrine courses), in-services highlighting disease process/treatments; review of existing and new protocols; and cross training which was accomplished by pairing staff from both units. After initial training, staff demonstrated basic knowledge. Over time competency proficiency has increased. A framework for an annual validation program was developed which included didactic assessment, skill demonstration, and critical thinking evaluation using disease-specific case scenarios. Ongoing annual assessments have revealed increase familiarity with the diverse population and treatment protocols. Staff verbalized less anxiety when caring for a previously unfamiliar population. During the integration phase, it is critical to ensure adequate staffing be maintained to continue ongoing training necessary for a successful transition. Consideration of staffing patterns should include an assessment of skill mix as staff increase their comfort level with the diverse population and proficiency with new competencies. Ongoing assessments provide a mechanism for determining additional educational and clinical experiences needed to keep staff current with the needs of the various populations. One of the many challenges is maintaining competencies in low frequency and high risk activities. The plan developed for the transition has been incorporated into our orientation program and annual revalidation program.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:05:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:05:21Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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