2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164699
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
THE ROLE OF THE CLINICAL TRIAL NURSE
Author(s):
Catamero, Donna; Coursen, Margaret; Lynch, Louise; Parise, Sara; Lesko, Zeonona; Moore, Sue; Mullaly, Kathleen
Author Details:
Donna Catamero, RN CCRC OCN, Clinical Research Nurse, NYU Cancer Institute, New York, New York, USA, email: domenica76@rcn.com; Margaret Coursen, RN, OCN; Louise Lynch, RN; Sara Parise, RN, BSN; Zeonona Lesko, RN, BSN; Sue Moore, APRN-BC, AOCNP; Kathleen Mullaly, MSN
Abstract:
The role of a clinical trial nurse (CTN) in an NCI designated academic cancer institute provides the opportunity to participate in cutting edge research. A better understanding of the highly specialized skills required of the CTN is needed. Standardization of the role is challenging due to numerous disease specific protocols implemented at multiple sites, with varied levels of complexity. Lack of role delineation and standardization of processes results in decrease utilization of expert CTN resources and leads to duplication of effort. The purpose of this project is to define and describe the role of the clinical trials nurse. Components of the Benner Model were used to define the level of CT nursing knowledge and skill. The novice level builds on knowledge base through practice and participation in the CT process. The competent level works autonomously and acts as a resource for the novice CTN. The expert level has an intuitive understanding of all aspects of clinical trials and acts as a resource for the multidisciplinary team. While defining and describing the role of a CTN the following were developed: 1) A CT competency evaluation tool that includes skills and knowledge required to a) Review and critique a protocol b) Screen patient for eligibility c) Participate in the informed consent process, clinical activities, regulatory/economic components and quality improvement. 2) An educational program for CTN's including a) Orientation b) Ongoing education c) Core competencies. Defining the role and educational needs of the CTN allows for identification of expert speakers and mentors. The following will be evaluated: 1. Pre and post tests for all CE approved education programs 2. CTN job satisfaction and 3. Peer evaluations using the competency tool. The CTN plays a pivotal role in maintaining the integrity of the protocol. Defining the CTN role provides an opportunity to better utilize their expertise.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTHE ROLE OF THE CLINICAL TRIAL NURSEen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCatamero, Donnaen_US
dc.contributor.authorCoursen, Margareten_US
dc.contributor.authorLynch, Louiseen_US
dc.contributor.authorParise, Saraen_US
dc.contributor.authorLesko, Zeononaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Sueen_US
dc.contributor.authorMullaly, Kathleenen_US
dc.author.detailsDonna Catamero, RN CCRC OCN, Clinical Research Nurse, NYU Cancer Institute, New York, New York, USA, email: domenica76@rcn.com; Margaret Coursen, RN, OCN; Louise Lynch, RN; Sara Parise, RN, BSN; Zeonona Lesko, RN, BSN; Sue Moore, APRN-BC, AOCNP; Kathleen Mullaly, MSNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164699-
dc.description.abstractThe role of a clinical trial nurse (CTN) in an NCI designated academic cancer institute provides the opportunity to participate in cutting edge research. A better understanding of the highly specialized skills required of the CTN is needed. Standardization of the role is challenging due to numerous disease specific protocols implemented at multiple sites, with varied levels of complexity. Lack of role delineation and standardization of processes results in decrease utilization of expert CTN resources and leads to duplication of effort. The purpose of this project is to define and describe the role of the clinical trials nurse. Components of the Benner Model were used to define the level of CT nursing knowledge and skill. The novice level builds on knowledge base through practice and participation in the CT process. The competent level works autonomously and acts as a resource for the novice CTN. The expert level has an intuitive understanding of all aspects of clinical trials and acts as a resource for the multidisciplinary team. While defining and describing the role of a CTN the following were developed: 1) A CT competency evaluation tool that includes skills and knowledge required to a) Review and critique a protocol b) Screen patient for eligibility c) Participate in the informed consent process, clinical activities, regulatory/economic components and quality improvement. 2) An educational program for CTN's including a) Orientation b) Ongoing education c) Core competencies. Defining the role and educational needs of the CTN allows for identification of expert speakers and mentors. The following will be evaluated: 1. Pre and post tests for all CE approved education programs 2. CTN job satisfaction and 3. Peer evaluations using the competency tool. The CTN plays a pivotal role in maintaining the integrity of the protocol. Defining the CTN role provides an opportunity to better utilize their expertise.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:05:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:05:23Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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