INCIDENCE AND NURSING MANAGEMENT OF HAND FOOT SKIN REACTION IN PATIENTS TREATED WITH ORAL TYROSINE KINASE INHIBITORS FOR METASTATIC RENAL CELL CARCINOMA

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164712
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
INCIDENCE AND NURSING MANAGEMENT OF HAND FOOT SKIN REACTION IN PATIENTS TREATED WITH ORAL TYROSINE KINASE INHIBITORS FOR METASTATIC RENAL CELL CARCINOMA
Author(s):
Graham, Suzy; Dutcher, Janice; Rosal-Greif, Victoria; Sacris, Linda; Koo, Jackson
Author Details:
Suzy Graham, RN, BSN, OCN, Clinical Research Coordinator, Our Lady Of Mercy Medical Center, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Bronx, New York, USA, email: sgraham@olmhs.org; Janice Dutcher, MD; Victoria Rosal-Greif, RN, MN; Linda Sacris, RN, OCN; Jackson Koo, CCRP
Abstract:
Sorafenib and sunitinib represent a new class of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) that are highly effective in the treatment of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Skin reactions such as hand foot skin reaction (HFSR) are clinically challenging adverse effects of TKIs. Educating oncology nurses on the identification, prevention and management of HFSR in patients receiving these novel agents is key to ensuring successful treatment. The purpose of this presentation is to provide the oncology nurse with insight into: 1. The pathophysiology of HFSR 2. The identification, management and need for early intervention of HFSR 3. Assessment and evaluation of HFSR 4. Nursing management strategies for the prevention and treatment of HFSR A retrospective chart review of 78 patients with metastatic RCC treated with oral TKIs from June 2005 to November 2006 was conducted. 57 patients were male and 21 female with a median age of 59 years (range 29-80 years). 60 patients received treatment with sorafenib and 18 with sunitinib. Patients were encouraged the frequent prophylactic use of OTC skin emollients, Eucerin or Aveeno. Patient teaching stressed the importance to identify and report skin reactions promptly. Grade 1-3 HFSR was observed in a total of 18 of the 78 patients (23%). 16 patients received treatment with sorafenib and 2 with sunitinib. Of these, 9 patients developed HFSR within 14 days of treatment initiation. Painful erythemia, calluses, peeling and/or blistering of the skin of the hands and/or feet typically represented the skin reactions. Grade 1 HFSR occurred in 5 patients and was managed with topical OTC skin creams Eucerin or Aveeno. Grade 2 HFSR was observed in 7 patients requiring the use of prescription topical emulsion, Biafine and also requiring dose reduction and/or interruption. Grade 3 HFSR was observed in 6 patients managed by both dose interruption and dose reduction. HFSR is a potentially dose limiting toxicity of TKI therapy. This project demonstrates the need for early identification and intervention for HFSR. Management guidelines and photographs will be shown to better educate oncology nurses on managing this challenging adverse effect.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleINCIDENCE AND NURSING MANAGEMENT OF HAND FOOT SKIN REACTION IN PATIENTS TREATED WITH ORAL TYROSINE KINASE INHIBITORS FOR METASTATIC RENAL CELL CARCINOMAen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGraham, Suzyen_US
dc.contributor.authorDutcher, Janiceen_US
dc.contributor.authorRosal-Greif, Victoriaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSacris, Lindaen_US
dc.contributor.authorKoo, Jacksonen_US
dc.author.detailsSuzy Graham, RN, BSN, OCN, Clinical Research Coordinator, Our Lady Of Mercy Medical Center, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Bronx, New York, USA, email: sgraham@olmhs.org; Janice Dutcher, MD; Victoria Rosal-Greif, RN, MN; Linda Sacris, RN, OCN; Jackson Koo, CCRPen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164712-
dc.description.abstractSorafenib and sunitinib represent a new class of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) that are highly effective in the treatment of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Skin reactions such as hand foot skin reaction (HFSR) are clinically challenging adverse effects of TKIs. Educating oncology nurses on the identification, prevention and management of HFSR in patients receiving these novel agents is key to ensuring successful treatment. The purpose of this presentation is to provide the oncology nurse with insight into: 1. The pathophysiology of HFSR 2. The identification, management and need for early intervention of HFSR 3. Assessment and evaluation of HFSR 4. Nursing management strategies for the prevention and treatment of HFSR A retrospective chart review of 78 patients with metastatic RCC treated with oral TKIs from June 2005 to November 2006 was conducted. 57 patients were male and 21 female with a median age of 59 years (range 29-80 years). 60 patients received treatment with sorafenib and 18 with sunitinib. Patients were encouraged the frequent prophylactic use of OTC skin emollients, Eucerin or Aveeno. Patient teaching stressed the importance to identify and report skin reactions promptly. Grade 1-3 HFSR was observed in a total of 18 of the 78 patients (23%). 16 patients received treatment with sorafenib and 2 with sunitinib. Of these, 9 patients developed HFSR within 14 days of treatment initiation. Painful erythemia, calluses, peeling and/or blistering of the skin of the hands and/or feet typically represented the skin reactions. Grade 1 HFSR occurred in 5 patients and was managed with topical OTC skin creams Eucerin or Aveeno. Grade 2 HFSR was observed in 7 patients requiring the use of prescription topical emulsion, Biafine and also requiring dose reduction and/or interruption. Grade 3 HFSR was observed in 6 patients managed by both dose interruption and dose reduction. HFSR is a potentially dose limiting toxicity of TKI therapy. This project demonstrates the need for early identification and intervention for HFSR. Management guidelines and photographs will be shown to better educate oncology nurses on managing this challenging adverse effect.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:05:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:05:37Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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