2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164714
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
ASIAN INDIAN WOMEN AND THEIR VIEWS ABOUT BREAST HEALTH
Author(s):
Hergert, Clara; Wu, Tsu-Yin
Author Details:
Clara Hergert, RN MSN OCN APRN BC, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Karmanos Cancer Center, Detroit, Michigan, USA, email: hergertc@karmanos.org; Tsu-Yin Wu, RN, PhD, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, Michigan
Abstract:
Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer among Asian Indian women in India. Little is known about the rates of breast cancer following immigration to the United States. Only one study, in the United States, has been done to review how Asian Indian women view breast cancer screening practices. The purpose of this study was to examine the views of breast health among Asian Indian women and to assess their knowledge toward breast cancer screening (i.e., breast self-exam, clinical breast exam, and mammography). The framework chosen for this study was the Health Belief Model. This study looked at the variables: perceived susceptibility, perceived seriousness, perceived benefit, and perceived barriers related to breast cancer screening. Sample was recruited from 2 Hindu temples in a Midwest, university -based community. The study group received a pretest, an intervention (educational program), and the posttest all in one day. There was only one study group used in this study. The instrument used for the pretest and posttest was developed using the Health Belief variables related to breast cancer screening. Data analysis was performed using SPSS software to compare pretest and posttest results. A small percentage (9%) of women reported practicing monthly breast self-exams, whereas just fewer than 50% of the women reported yearly clinical breast exams (46%) and mammograms (47%). Over 50% of the women reported that they did not have the skills/ knowledge to perform breast self-exams. After the educational program the amount of women that stated they would perform monthly breast self-exam increased from 9% to 80% and 100% of the women now felt they had the skill/knowledge to perform breast self-exams. The women also reported increased knowledge about clinical breast exams and mammograms after the educational program, by stating that they would initiate scheduling appointments for both. The study showed that education is the key to helping improve perceived barriers and benefits for the group of Asian Indian women studied. Oncology nurses have the opportunity to provide this education to Asian Indian women.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleASIAN INDIAN WOMEN AND THEIR VIEWS ABOUT BREAST HEALTHen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHergert, Claraen_US
dc.contributor.authorWu, Tsu-Yinen_US
dc.author.detailsClara Hergert, RN MSN OCN APRN BC, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Karmanos Cancer Center, Detroit, Michigan, USA, email: hergertc@karmanos.org; Tsu-Yin Wu, RN, PhD, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, Michiganen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164714-
dc.description.abstractBreast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer among Asian Indian women in India. Little is known about the rates of breast cancer following immigration to the United States. Only one study, in the United States, has been done to review how Asian Indian women view breast cancer screening practices. The purpose of this study was to examine the views of breast health among Asian Indian women and to assess their knowledge toward breast cancer screening (i.e., breast self-exam, clinical breast exam, and mammography). The framework chosen for this study was the Health Belief Model. This study looked at the variables: perceived susceptibility, perceived seriousness, perceived benefit, and perceived barriers related to breast cancer screening. Sample was recruited from 2 Hindu temples in a Midwest, university -based community. The study group received a pretest, an intervention (educational program), and the posttest all in one day. There was only one study group used in this study. The instrument used for the pretest and posttest was developed using the Health Belief variables related to breast cancer screening. Data analysis was performed using SPSS software to compare pretest and posttest results. A small percentage (9%) of women reported practicing monthly breast self-exams, whereas just fewer than 50% of the women reported yearly clinical breast exams (46%) and mammograms (47%). Over 50% of the women reported that they did not have the skills/ knowledge to perform breast self-exams. After the educational program the amount of women that stated they would perform monthly breast self-exam increased from 9% to 80% and 100% of the women now felt they had the skill/knowledge to perform breast self-exams. The women also reported increased knowledge about clinical breast exams and mammograms after the educational program, by stating that they would initiate scheduling appointments for both. The study showed that education is the key to helping improve perceived barriers and benefits for the group of Asian Indian women studied. Oncology nurses have the opportunity to provide this education to Asian Indian women.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:05:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:05:39Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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