IMPLEMENTING EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE WITH LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE PROJECT PLAN V.2

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164716
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
IMPLEMENTING EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE WITH LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE PROJECT PLAN V.2
Author(s):
Idell, Cynthia; Grant, Marcia
Author Details:
Cynthia Idell, RN BA MSN AOCN, Professional Practice Leader, Medical Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California, USA, email: cidell@coh.org; Marcia Grant, RN, DNSC, FAAN
Abstract:
Although evidence-based practice (EBP) is a focus of the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS), staff adaptation of EBP remains challenging. A recent staff nurse survey indicated 29% have no experience with EBP while 47% are considered ôbeginnersö. Knowledge gaps occur despite multi-year efforts aimed at translating research into practice using case studies / EBP review. Barriers include time constraints, knowledge deficits, and resource access. EBP is essential for organizational strategic goals, e.g. shared governance councils and identification of nurse-sensitive patient outcomes. An organizational approach to promote staff utilization of EBP is desirable. Through participation in the ONS Leadership Development Institute, an advanced practice nurse designed a project plan containing a tiered strategy to institutionalize EBP practice. The first tier piloted an EBP curriculum to train staff RNs to identify nurse-sensitive patient outcomes, to review clinical practice guidelines, and to incorporate guideline concepts into daily practice through by creating specific action plans. The target audience was nurses who wished to become conscious consumers of EBP. In the second tier, EBP champions moved on to populate shared governance clinical practice, quality, and research councils. A project team created EBP curriculum to build staff skill-sets. Internal and external assessments were performed, including driving / restraining forces. The course contained action-oriented, interactive activity to promote clinician use of EBP. Approaches included: expert EBP faculty lectures, small group work, computer training, case studies and clinical practice guideline application. Project plans were generated; follow-up occurred at 3 and 6 month intervals. Additional funding for EBP champion training was realized through an Uni-Health grant. Project goals were evaluated via: 1) Pre-post test EBP knowledge surveys; 2) Council participation; 3) Evaluation of project plan outcomes by faculty; and 4) Performance improvement trends of nurse- sensitive outcomes, e.g. pain / fatigue management. Evidence-based practice is a growing field, yet nurses face barriers in adaptation of best practices. For example, symptom management falls within the RN scope of practice and outcomes are nursing sensitive. An interactive EBP curriculum designed to minimize barriers and to increase staff awareness, when combined with long-term follow- up of individual project plans, may be used to institutionalize.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIMPLEMENTING EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE WITH LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE PROJECT PLAN V.2en_GB
dc.contributor.authorIdell, Cynthiaen_US
dc.contributor.authorGrant, Marciaen_US
dc.author.detailsCynthia Idell, RN BA MSN AOCN, Professional Practice Leader, Medical Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California, USA, email: cidell@coh.org; Marcia Grant, RN, DNSC, FAANen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164716-
dc.description.abstractAlthough evidence-based practice (EBP) is a focus of the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS), staff adaptation of EBP remains challenging. A recent staff nurse survey indicated 29% have no experience with EBP while 47% are considered ôbeginnersö. Knowledge gaps occur despite multi-year efforts aimed at translating research into practice using case studies / EBP review. Barriers include time constraints, knowledge deficits, and resource access. EBP is essential for organizational strategic goals, e.g. shared governance councils and identification of nurse-sensitive patient outcomes. An organizational approach to promote staff utilization of EBP is desirable. Through participation in the ONS Leadership Development Institute, an advanced practice nurse designed a project plan containing a tiered strategy to institutionalize EBP practice. The first tier piloted an EBP curriculum to train staff RNs to identify nurse-sensitive patient outcomes, to review clinical practice guidelines, and to incorporate guideline concepts into daily practice through by creating specific action plans. The target audience was nurses who wished to become conscious consumers of EBP. In the second tier, EBP champions moved on to populate shared governance clinical practice, quality, and research councils. A project team created EBP curriculum to build staff skill-sets. Internal and external assessments were performed, including driving / restraining forces. The course contained action-oriented, interactive activity to promote clinician use of EBP. Approaches included: expert EBP faculty lectures, small group work, computer training, case studies and clinical practice guideline application. Project plans were generated; follow-up occurred at 3 and 6 month intervals. Additional funding for EBP champion training was realized through an Uni-Health grant. Project goals were evaluated via: 1) Pre-post test EBP knowledge surveys; 2) Council participation; 3) Evaluation of project plan outcomes by faculty; and 4) Performance improvement trends of nurse- sensitive outcomes, e.g. pain / fatigue management. Evidence-based practice is a growing field, yet nurses face barriers in adaptation of best practices. For example, symptom management falls within the RN scope of practice and outcomes are nursing sensitive. An interactive EBP curriculum designed to minimize barriers and to increase staff awareness, when combined with long-term follow- up of individual project plans, may be used to institutionalize.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:05:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:05:41Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.