ONCOLOGY NURSING AND COMPASSION FATIGUE: CARING UNTIL IT HURTS. WHO IS CARING FOR THE CAREGIVER?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164723
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
ONCOLOGY NURSING AND COMPASSION FATIGUE: CARING UNTIL IT HURTS. WHO IS CARING FOR THE CAREGIVER?
Author(s):
McMullen, Lori
Author Details:
Lori McMullen, BSN RN OCN, Oncology Practice Nurse, St, Princeton, New Jersey, USA, email: lori.mcmullen@princetonhcs.org
Abstract:
The feeling of empathy which is a key component to a therapeutic relationship with a client and family can become overwhelming in a field that demands strength and resiliency. Working with cancer patients challenges the oncology nurse with a variety of difficult issues, from ethical concerns and palliative care, to intense interactions with patients and families to intricate treatments and end of life decisions. The consequence of this constant expenditure of empathy is called compassion fatigue, literally caring until it hurts. Compassion fatigue, a stress response that is sudden and acute has been defined as a physical, emotional and spiritual fatigue or exhaustion that takes over a person and causes a decline in his/her ability to experience joy or care for others. If not recognized and treated, compassion fatigue can interfere with the ability to give quality nursing care that is safe and effective, can cause physical and emotional exhaustion, and result in depersonalization and ultimately burnout. The purpose of this study is to examine the ability of the oncology nurse to recognize compassion fatigue and to examine the organizational support systems available to the inpatient and outpatient oncology nurse. This study is supported by the humanistic theory of Paterson & Zderad and BastonÆs social psychology theory, the empathy altruism hypothesis. The relationship of compassion fatigue and stress is supported by the work of Lazarus and Folkman. A descriptive and correlational survey will be used by distributing a self-completed survey to ~30 oncology nurses at a local chapter meeting of ONS. Inpatient and outpatient oncology nurses at a community based hospital will be asked to participate in the study. The measure will be the Professional Quality of Life Scale (ProQOL): Compassion Satisfaction, Burnout and Compassion Fatigue/Secondary Trauma Scale by Stamm (1997-2005). Demographics will be collected to establish field of practice and availability of organizational support system. Preliminary implications suggest that oncology nurses are ignorant of the term and associated symptoms of compassion fatigue. While prevention is clearly the most effective means of coping with compassion fatigue, it seems that health organizations are not supporting the psychological well being of staff.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleONCOLOGY NURSING AND COMPASSION FATIGUE: CARING UNTIL IT HURTS. WHO IS CARING FOR THE CAREGIVER?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcMullen, Lorien_US
dc.author.detailsLori McMullen, BSN RN OCN, Oncology Practice Nurse, St, Princeton, New Jersey, USA, email: lori.mcmullen@princetonhcs.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164723-
dc.description.abstractThe feeling of empathy which is a key component to a therapeutic relationship with a client and family can become overwhelming in a field that demands strength and resiliency. Working with cancer patients challenges the oncology nurse with a variety of difficult issues, from ethical concerns and palliative care, to intense interactions with patients and families to intricate treatments and end of life decisions. The consequence of this constant expenditure of empathy is called compassion fatigue, literally caring until it hurts. Compassion fatigue, a stress response that is sudden and acute has been defined as a physical, emotional and spiritual fatigue or exhaustion that takes over a person and causes a decline in his/her ability to experience joy or care for others. If not recognized and treated, compassion fatigue can interfere with the ability to give quality nursing care that is safe and effective, can cause physical and emotional exhaustion, and result in depersonalization and ultimately burnout. The purpose of this study is to examine the ability of the oncology nurse to recognize compassion fatigue and to examine the organizational support systems available to the inpatient and outpatient oncology nurse. This study is supported by the humanistic theory of Paterson & Zderad and BastonÆs social psychology theory, the empathy altruism hypothesis. The relationship of compassion fatigue and stress is supported by the work of Lazarus and Folkman. A descriptive and correlational survey will be used by distributing a self-completed survey to ~30 oncology nurses at a local chapter meeting of ONS. Inpatient and outpatient oncology nurses at a community based hospital will be asked to participate in the study. The measure will be the Professional Quality of Life Scale (ProQOL): Compassion Satisfaction, Burnout and Compassion Fatigue/Secondary Trauma Scale by Stamm (1997-2005). Demographics will be collected to establish field of practice and availability of organizational support system. Preliminary implications suggest that oncology nurses are ignorant of the term and associated symptoms of compassion fatigue. While prevention is clearly the most effective means of coping with compassion fatigue, it seems that health organizations are not supporting the psychological well being of staff.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:05:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:05:48Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.