FEASIBILITY FOR TESTING THE THERAPEUTIC ADMINISTRATION OF AN ORANGE TO RELIEVE TASTE AND SMELL SENSATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH DIMETHYL SULFOXIDE (DMSO) DURING STEM CELL REINFUSION

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164731
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
FEASIBILITY FOR TESTING THE THERAPEUTIC ADMINISTRATION OF AN ORANGE TO RELIEVE TASTE AND SMELL SENSATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH DIMETHYL SULFOXIDE (DMSO) DURING STEM CELL REINFUSION
Author(s):
Potter, Pamela; Eisenberg, Seth; Donna Berry, Donna
Author Details:
Pamela Potter, APRN BC DNSc, Senior Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Washington School of Nursing, Seattle, Washington, USA, email: potterpj@u.washington.edu; Seth Eisenberg, RN, OCN, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, WA; Donna Berry, RN, PhD, AOCN, FAAN
Abstract:
Autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (SCT) is used to treat a number of malignancies. Collected cells are stored and frozen in liquid nitrogen using DMSO as a cellular preservative. DMSO has a noxious taste and odor that frequently produces unpleasant throat sensations, coughing, nausea, retching and vomiting (NRV). An untested and informal practice at a designated cancer center involved use of an orange to alleviate these symptoms. This study purpose and specific aim was to test the feasibility for studying efficacy of sliced orange, orange aromatherapy, or deep breathing for relief of coughing, throat irritation, and NRV during reinfusion of stem cells cryopreserved in DMSO. The Human Response Framework, incorporating individual vulnerability and environmental risk and the interplay of biological, psychological and social human responses that influence illness outcomes, provided the studyÆs conceptual foundation. A randomized, Phase II pilot was conducted with 60 patients receiving at least two bags of cryopreserved stem cells. Forty-four men and 16 women were randomized to one of three groups: Orange (OG) (n = 19), Orange Aroma (AG) (n = 23), and Control (CG) (n = 18). The study employed a time series design with an early versus late intervention format where CG participants were re-randomized after three cell bags to OG or AG. Data analysis controlled for weight, gender and infusion rate. Those reporting minimal symptoms who ôdid not useö the intervention were treated as missing in the ôreliefö analysis. The groups were equivalent on demographics and baseline intensity symptoms. Data analysis demonstrated no significant difference in tickle/cough intensity, nausea or retching intensity, or incidence of vomiting among the groups. On a ten-point scale from 0 (none) to 10 (most relief), for the second bag of infused cells, the OG reported significantly (p = 0.041) more symptom relief than did the AG or CG. The OG demonstrated a trend (p = 0.059) toward more symptom relief over the first three bags than did the AG or CG. Findings from this pilot suggest potential efficacy as well as clinical benefit for patients receiving autologous SCT. A definitive, multi-site, randomized trial is recommended.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFEASIBILITY FOR TESTING THE THERAPEUTIC ADMINISTRATION OF AN ORANGE TO RELIEVE TASTE AND SMELL SENSATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH DIMETHYL SULFOXIDE (DMSO) DURING STEM CELL REINFUSIONen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPotter, Pamelaen_US
dc.contributor.authorEisenberg, Sethen_US
dc.contributor.authorDonna Berry, Donnaen_US
dc.author.detailsPamela Potter, APRN BC DNSc, Senior Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Washington School of Nursing, Seattle, Washington, USA, email: potterpj@u.washington.edu; Seth Eisenberg, RN, OCN, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, WA; Donna Berry, RN, PhD, AOCN, FAANen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164731-
dc.description.abstractAutologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (SCT) is used to treat a number of malignancies. Collected cells are stored and frozen in liquid nitrogen using DMSO as a cellular preservative. DMSO has a noxious taste and odor that frequently produces unpleasant throat sensations, coughing, nausea, retching and vomiting (NRV). An untested and informal practice at a designated cancer center involved use of an orange to alleviate these symptoms. This study purpose and specific aim was to test the feasibility for studying efficacy of sliced orange, orange aromatherapy, or deep breathing for relief of coughing, throat irritation, and NRV during reinfusion of stem cells cryopreserved in DMSO. The Human Response Framework, incorporating individual vulnerability and environmental risk and the interplay of biological, psychological and social human responses that influence illness outcomes, provided the studyÆs conceptual foundation. A randomized, Phase II pilot was conducted with 60 patients receiving at least two bags of cryopreserved stem cells. Forty-four men and 16 women were randomized to one of three groups: Orange (OG) (n = 19), Orange Aroma (AG) (n = 23), and Control (CG) (n = 18). The study employed a time series design with an early versus late intervention format where CG participants were re-randomized after three cell bags to OG or AG. Data analysis controlled for weight, gender and infusion rate. Those reporting minimal symptoms who ôdid not useö the intervention were treated as missing in the ôreliefö analysis. The groups were equivalent on demographics and baseline intensity symptoms. Data analysis demonstrated no significant difference in tickle/cough intensity, nausea or retching intensity, or incidence of vomiting among the groups. On a ten-point scale from 0 (none) to 10 (most relief), for the second bag of infused cells, the OG reported significantly (p = 0.041) more symptom relief than did the AG or CG. The OG demonstrated a trend (p = 0.059) toward more symptom relief over the first three bags than did the AG or CG. Findings from this pilot suggest potential efficacy as well as clinical benefit for patients receiving autologous SCT. A definitive, multi-site, randomized trial is recommended.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:05:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:05:56Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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