2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164732
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
REDUCING NOISE LEVELS ON A BUSY ONCOLOGY UNIT
Author(s):
Rashba, Kira; Reedy, Anita; Busch-Vishniac, Ilene; West, James; McLeod, Mark
Author Details:
Kira Rashba, BSN, RN, Nurse Clinician I, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: krashba1@jhmi.edu; Reedy Anita, RN, MSN, OCN; Ilene Busch-Vishniac, PhD; James West, PhD; Mark McLeod
Abstract:
Hospital noise levels have increased in recent years. This is partially attributed to technology such as monitors, infusion pumps and bed alarms. Alarms, combined with call systems and staff conversations, make for a noisy environment. The World Health Organization (WHO) and Environmental Protection Agency recommend noise levels less than 40-45 decibels (dB) during the day and 35dB at night. Elevated noise levels make it difficult to hear conversations between health care providers, increasing the risk for medical errors. Higher noise levels also cause stress among health care workers and patients have difficulty resting. Oncology units are at a particular disadvantage as a result of infection control practices requiring hard surface materials. Noise level on this busy NCI-designated comprehensive cancer centerÆs hematology oncology unit was irritating and caused difficulty on morning rounds and throughout the day. Patients complained of seemingly constant alarms, intercom calls and voice noise. Noise levels on the unit were measured at 70dB, about that of a street car passing, well above the WHO recommendations. The purpose was to decrease sound levels on the unit. Noise reduction panels were designed by acoustical engineers and were approved by nursing, infection control and housekeeping. Two inch fiberglass pieces were covered with sound absorbing materials and were installed on walls and ceilings of work areas. Panels were designed to be easily removed and cleaned. Acoustical engineers measured noise levels before and after the installation of noise panels. Quantitative and qualitative measures were taken: noise levels and reverberation times were measured and patient and staff surveys were completed. Quantitative measures showed that after sound panel installation noise levels dropped by more than 15 dB and reverberation times decreased by nearly a factor of three. Both staff and patient surveys demonstrated a lessened perception of noise. After installation of noise reduction panels, both patients and staff realized a new, quieter environment. Hospitals can intervene to decrease the amount of environmental noise, thus decreasing the risk of medical errors, stress of staff and interruption of rest in the hospitalized patient.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleREDUCING NOISE LEVELS ON A BUSY ONCOLOGY UNITen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRashba, Kiraen_US
dc.contributor.authorReedy, Anitaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBusch-Vishniac, Ileneen_US
dc.contributor.authorWest, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcLeod, Marken_US
dc.author.detailsKira Rashba, BSN, RN, Nurse Clinician I, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: krashba1@jhmi.edu; Reedy Anita, RN, MSN, OCN; Ilene Busch-Vishniac, PhD; James West, PhD; Mark McLeoden_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164732-
dc.description.abstractHospital noise levels have increased in recent years. This is partially attributed to technology such as monitors, infusion pumps and bed alarms. Alarms, combined with call systems and staff conversations, make for a noisy environment. The World Health Organization (WHO) and Environmental Protection Agency recommend noise levels less than 40-45 decibels (dB) during the day and 35dB at night. Elevated noise levels make it difficult to hear conversations between health care providers, increasing the risk for medical errors. Higher noise levels also cause stress among health care workers and patients have difficulty resting. Oncology units are at a particular disadvantage as a result of infection control practices requiring hard surface materials. Noise level on this busy NCI-designated comprehensive cancer centerÆs hematology oncology unit was irritating and caused difficulty on morning rounds and throughout the day. Patients complained of seemingly constant alarms, intercom calls and voice noise. Noise levels on the unit were measured at 70dB, about that of a street car passing, well above the WHO recommendations. The purpose was to decrease sound levels on the unit. Noise reduction panels were designed by acoustical engineers and were approved by nursing, infection control and housekeeping. Two inch fiberglass pieces were covered with sound absorbing materials and were installed on walls and ceilings of work areas. Panels were designed to be easily removed and cleaned. Acoustical engineers measured noise levels before and after the installation of noise panels. Quantitative and qualitative measures were taken: noise levels and reverberation times were measured and patient and staff surveys were completed. Quantitative measures showed that after sound panel installation noise levels dropped by more than 15 dB and reverberation times decreased by nearly a factor of three. Both staff and patient surveys demonstrated a lessened perception of noise. After installation of noise reduction panels, both patients and staff realized a new, quieter environment. Hospitals can intervene to decrease the amount of environmental noise, thus decreasing the risk of medical errors, stress of staff and interruption of rest in the hospitalized patient.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:05:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:05:57Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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