GASTROINTESTINAL SYMPTOMS AND GROWTH PATTERNS IN CHILDREN POST BONE MARROW TRANSPLANT

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164733
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
GASTROINTESTINAL SYMPTOMS AND GROWTH PATTERNS IN CHILDREN POST BONE MARROW TRANSPLANT
Author(s):
Rodgers, Cheryl; Wills-Alcoser, Patricia; Monroe, Rebecca; McDonald, Lisa; Trevino, Melisa; Hockenberry, Marilyn
Author Details:
Cheryl Rodgers, RN MSN CPNP CPON, Pediatric Nurse Practitioner, Texas Children's Cancer Center and Hematology Service, Houston, Texas, USA, email: ccrodger@txccc.org; Patricia Wills-Alcoser, RN, MSN, CPNP; Rebecca Monroe, RN, MSN, CPNP; Lisa McDonald, RN, MSN, CPNP; Melisa Trevino, RN, MSN, CPNP; Marilyn Hockenberry, PhD, RN-CS, PNP, FAAN
Abstract:
Children are at risk for long-term malnutrition after a bone marrow transplant (BMT) due to poor oral intake, altered absorption and increased metabolic demands as a result of medical complications and/or medication toxicities. Despite these known risks, little research has been performed to evaluate long-term nutritional issues in children post BMT. The purposes of the study were to identify the growth patterns and gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in children during the first four months post BMT, and to assess if an association exists between acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and growth pattern changes or GI symptoms. The University of California San Francisco Symptom Management Model, which emphasizes the need for a thorough assessment of the symptom experience to guide symptom management and avoid negative outcomes, provided a conceptual framework for this research. This descriptive study used a prospective, longitudinal cohort design. A convenience sample of 45 children receiving an allogeneic BMT completed the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale and anthropometric measurements before BMT then 2 months and 4 months post BMT. Data analysis was performed with repeated measure ANOVA to evaluate anthropometric changes, descriptive statistics to analyze GI symptoms and a t-test and chi-square test to evaluate anthropometric measurements and GI symptoms between children with and without GVHD. All anthropometric measurements of children showed a significant change over the 4-month period. The mean height increased over the 4 months with all other anthropometric measurements including weight, skinfold triceps and midarm circumference showed a significant decrease. There was a common occurrence of symptoms such as lack of appetite, nausea and diarrhea throughout the repeated measures. No statistical significant difference was noted in any of the anthropometric measurements or frequency of GI symptoms between children with and without GVHD. Children experience several GI symptoms throughout the BMT recovery phase that can lead to poor outcomes, such as weight loss. Nurses need to monitor patients' GI symptoms frequently during the acute BMT recovery phase to identify changes that require nutritional assistance in order to guide symptom management to achieve positive outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: Oncology Nursing Foundation through an unrestricted grant from Ortho Biotech Products, L.P.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGASTROINTESTINAL SYMPTOMS AND GROWTH PATTERNS IN CHILDREN POST BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRodgers, Cherylen_US
dc.contributor.authorWills-Alcoser, Patriciaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMonroe, Rebeccaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcDonald, Lisaen_US
dc.contributor.authorTrevino, Melisaen_US
dc.contributor.authorHockenberry, Marilynen_US
dc.author.detailsCheryl Rodgers, RN MSN CPNP CPON, Pediatric Nurse Practitioner, Texas Children's Cancer Center and Hematology Service, Houston, Texas, USA, email: ccrodger@txccc.org; Patricia Wills-Alcoser, RN, MSN, CPNP; Rebecca Monroe, RN, MSN, CPNP; Lisa McDonald, RN, MSN, CPNP; Melisa Trevino, RN, MSN, CPNP; Marilyn Hockenberry, PhD, RN-CS, PNP, FAANen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164733-
dc.description.abstractChildren are at risk for long-term malnutrition after a bone marrow transplant (BMT) due to poor oral intake, altered absorption and increased metabolic demands as a result of medical complications and/or medication toxicities. Despite these known risks, little research has been performed to evaluate long-term nutritional issues in children post BMT. The purposes of the study were to identify the growth patterns and gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in children during the first four months post BMT, and to assess if an association exists between acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and growth pattern changes or GI symptoms. The University of California San Francisco Symptom Management Model, which emphasizes the need for a thorough assessment of the symptom experience to guide symptom management and avoid negative outcomes, provided a conceptual framework for this research. This descriptive study used a prospective, longitudinal cohort design. A convenience sample of 45 children receiving an allogeneic BMT completed the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale and anthropometric measurements before BMT then 2 months and 4 months post BMT. Data analysis was performed with repeated measure ANOVA to evaluate anthropometric changes, descriptive statistics to analyze GI symptoms and a t-test and chi-square test to evaluate anthropometric measurements and GI symptoms between children with and without GVHD. All anthropometric measurements of children showed a significant change over the 4-month period. The mean height increased over the 4 months with all other anthropometric measurements including weight, skinfold triceps and midarm circumference showed a significant decrease. There was a common occurrence of symptoms such as lack of appetite, nausea and diarrhea throughout the repeated measures. No statistical significant difference was noted in any of the anthropometric measurements or frequency of GI symptoms between children with and without GVHD. Children experience several GI symptoms throughout the BMT recovery phase that can lead to poor outcomes, such as weight loss. Nurses need to monitor patients' GI symptoms frequently during the acute BMT recovery phase to identify changes that require nutritional assistance in order to guide symptom management to achieve positive outcomes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:05:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:05:59Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: Oncology Nursing Foundation through an unrestricted grant from Ortho Biotech Products, L.P.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.