EVALUATING A NEURO-ONCOLOGY INFORMATION HOTLINE AS A COMPLEMENT TO CLINICAL CARE

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164735
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
EVALUATING A NEURO-ONCOLOGY INFORMATION HOTLINE AS A COMPLEMENT TO CLINICAL CARE
Author(s):
Spezeski, Jenette; Lovely, Mary; Patterson, Harriet
Author Details:
Jenette Spezeski, MPH, Program Specialist, National Brain Tumor Foundation, San Francisco, California, USA, email: spezeski@braintumor.org; Mary Lovely, RN, PhD; Harriet Patterson, MPH
Abstract:
The plethora of information accompanying a cancer diagnosis can overwhelm patients and their caregivers, resulting in questions that arise between medical visits. A neuro-oncology information hotline is intended to bridge this gap by providing information on topics ranging from brain tumor types and treatments, caregiving issues, symptom management, and referrals to support-related resources. The purpose of this initiative was to evaluate the usefulness of a neuro-oncology hotline to its callers. Further, the evaluation sought to gather information about who uses the service, why individuals call the hotline, and which needs were not being met. Trained interviewees conducted a retrospective telephone survey with a sample of callers who had used the hotline over a six-week period. The questionnaire was pilot-tested and contained 19 multiple choice and 4 open-ended questions. Of the 107 individuals contacted, 75 (70%) completed the survey. Responses were summarized and open-ended questions were analyzed using qualitative research methods. Callers were primarily female (79%) and Caucasian (85%). Nearly 65% of callers were between 46 and 65 years old, whereas only 4% of callers were 35 years or younger. Fifty-two percent were the friend or family of a patient, while 35% self-identified as a patient. Callers contacted the hotline seeking information, support, or because of circumstances such as a diagnosis or treatment options. Eighty- one percent of callers received educational materials, 37% received a consultation with a neuro-oncology nurse, and 34% of callers were referred to support-related resources. Callers expressed satisfaction with their experience and found the information to be quite helpful. Unmet needs included resources on long-term survivorship and the practical impact of a cancer diagnosis. Virtually all of callers said they would recommend the hotline to others needing information about brain tumors. This survey highlights the important role of patient hotlines as a complement to oncology nursing. Neuro-oncology is a specialized field and quality information can be found through a hotline venue. Hotlines empower patients to seek quality information about their diagnosis. Referring patients to hotlines raises awareness about the helpful services available. Partnerships between nurses and patient groups will address unmet needs and reach underserved populations.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEVALUATING A NEURO-ONCOLOGY INFORMATION HOTLINE AS A COMPLEMENT TO CLINICAL CAREen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSpezeski, Jenetteen_US
dc.contributor.authorLovely, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.authorPatterson, Harrieten_US
dc.author.detailsJenette Spezeski, MPH, Program Specialist, National Brain Tumor Foundation, San Francisco, California, USA, email: spezeski@braintumor.org; Mary Lovely, RN, PhD; Harriet Patterson, MPHen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164735-
dc.description.abstractThe plethora of information accompanying a cancer diagnosis can overwhelm patients and their caregivers, resulting in questions that arise between medical visits. A neuro-oncology information hotline is intended to bridge this gap by providing information on topics ranging from brain tumor types and treatments, caregiving issues, symptom management, and referrals to support-related resources. The purpose of this initiative was to evaluate the usefulness of a neuro-oncology hotline to its callers. Further, the evaluation sought to gather information about who uses the service, why individuals call the hotline, and which needs were not being met. Trained interviewees conducted a retrospective telephone survey with a sample of callers who had used the hotline over a six-week period. The questionnaire was pilot-tested and contained 19 multiple choice and 4 open-ended questions. Of the 107 individuals contacted, 75 (70%) completed the survey. Responses were summarized and open-ended questions were analyzed using qualitative research methods. Callers were primarily female (79%) and Caucasian (85%). Nearly 65% of callers were between 46 and 65 years old, whereas only 4% of callers were 35 years or younger. Fifty-two percent were the friend or family of a patient, while 35% self-identified as a patient. Callers contacted the hotline seeking information, support, or because of circumstances such as a diagnosis or treatment options. Eighty- one percent of callers received educational materials, 37% received a consultation with a neuro-oncology nurse, and 34% of callers were referred to support-related resources. Callers expressed satisfaction with their experience and found the information to be quite helpful. Unmet needs included resources on long-term survivorship and the practical impact of a cancer diagnosis. Virtually all of callers said they would recommend the hotline to others needing information about brain tumors. This survey highlights the important role of patient hotlines as a complement to oncology nursing. Neuro-oncology is a specialized field and quality information can be found through a hotline venue. Hotlines empower patients to seek quality information about their diagnosis. Referring patients to hotlines raises awareness about the helpful services available. Partnerships between nurses and patient groups will address unmet needs and reach underserved populations.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:06:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:06:01Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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