2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164740
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A CLINICAL MODEL OF CARING FOR THE ADULT SURVIVOR OF PEDIATRIC CANCER
Author(s):
Tucci, Roseann; Diotallevi, Deborah; Pottenger, Elaine; Whittam, Beth
Author Details:
Roseann Tucci, MSN ANP, Nurse Practitioner, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, email: tuccir@mskcc.org; Deborah Diotallevi, RN, MSN, CPNP; Elaine Pottenger, RN, MSN, CPNP; Beth Whittam, RN, MSN, CFNP
Abstract:
There are approximately 270,000 survivors of pediatric cancers in the United States. Approximately 1 in 640 young adults is a survivor of a pediatric cancer. The Cancer Childhood Survivor Study demonstrated that approximately 66% of survivors have at least 1 chronic complication related to their cancer therapy. Many of these adult survivors have to navigate a complicated medical system that often is not sensitive to their needs. In response to the varied health needs of pediatric cancer survivors, long term follow up programs were developed in the 1990s. In 1991 our institution established the Pediatric Long Term Follow up Program. The team consists of a pediatric endocrinologist, two pediatric nurse practitioners and a social worker. Since its inception this program has seen 1117 patients. Many of the pediatric patients enrolled in this program are now in their 20s and are ready to transition into a program that can address their adult health care needs. In 2005, in conjunction with a major survivorship initiative at the Center, MSKCC introduced a new program for Adult Survivors of Pediatric Cancers (ASP). Since its inception in August 2005, the ASP team has seen 125 patients, 46 of which have been direct referrals from the Pediatric LTFU program. This team consists of a family physician, two adult nurse practitioners and a social worker. The ASP program is an extension of the LTFU. Communication between the two teams is vital. The ASP program addresses many of the issues that are problematic for the survivor of a pediatric cancer. These include second malignancies, cardiac, pulmonary, renal, and endocrine dysfunction, as well as a variety of quality of life issues, such as fertility. Both programs assess, educate, counsel and screen survivors for long term effects related to their individual cancer treatment. A treatment summary, along with recommendations for follow up is given to each patient. Preventive health practices are emphasized. As the number of childhood cancer survivors increase it is critical that oncology nurses have an understanding of the complexity of care needed and the services available.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA CLINICAL MODEL OF CARING FOR THE ADULT SURVIVOR OF PEDIATRIC CANCERen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTucci, Roseannen_US
dc.contributor.authorDiotallevi, Deborahen_US
dc.contributor.authorPottenger, Elaineen_US
dc.contributor.authorWhittam, Bethen_US
dc.author.detailsRoseann Tucci, MSN ANP, Nurse Practitioner, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, email: tuccir@mskcc.org; Deborah Diotallevi, RN, MSN, CPNP; Elaine Pottenger, RN, MSN, CPNP; Beth Whittam, RN, MSN, CFNPen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164740-
dc.description.abstractThere are approximately 270,000 survivors of pediatric cancers in the United States. Approximately 1 in 640 young adults is a survivor of a pediatric cancer. The Cancer Childhood Survivor Study demonstrated that approximately 66% of survivors have at least 1 chronic complication related to their cancer therapy. Many of these adult survivors have to navigate a complicated medical system that often is not sensitive to their needs. In response to the varied health needs of pediatric cancer survivors, long term follow up programs were developed in the 1990s. In 1991 our institution established the Pediatric Long Term Follow up Program. The team consists of a pediatric endocrinologist, two pediatric nurse practitioners and a social worker. Since its inception this program has seen 1117 patients. Many of the pediatric patients enrolled in this program are now in their 20s and are ready to transition into a program that can address their adult health care needs. In 2005, in conjunction with a major survivorship initiative at the Center, MSKCC introduced a new program for Adult Survivors of Pediatric Cancers (ASP). Since its inception in August 2005, the ASP team has seen 125 patients, 46 of which have been direct referrals from the Pediatric LTFU program. This team consists of a family physician, two adult nurse practitioners and a social worker. The ASP program is an extension of the LTFU. Communication between the two teams is vital. The ASP program addresses many of the issues that are problematic for the survivor of a pediatric cancer. These include second malignancies, cardiac, pulmonary, renal, and endocrine dysfunction, as well as a variety of quality of life issues, such as fertility. Both programs assess, educate, counsel and screen survivors for long term effects related to their individual cancer treatment. A treatment summary, along with recommendations for follow up is given to each patient. Preventive health practices are emphasized. As the number of childhood cancer survivors increase it is critical that oncology nurses have an understanding of the complexity of care needed and the services available.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:06:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:06:06Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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