2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164741
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
IMPACT OF AN ONCOLOGY NURSING CRITICAL THINKING PROJECT
Author(s):
Westlake, Susan; Delzer,Nancy; OÆConnell, Patty; Quinn-Casper, Patricia
Author Details:
Susan Westlake, PhD RN AOCNS, Oncology Clinical Nurse Specialist, Columbia St. Mary's, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, email: swestlak@columbia-stmarys.org; Nancy Delzer, MBA, MSN; Patty O'Connell, BS, BSN; Patricia Quinn-Casper, MSN, MAPS
Abstract:
The ability to think critically, and sensitively, is an essential component of competent oncology nursing practice. The impact of an innovative project designed to foster such thinking is examined in the one-year evaluation data from 90 nurses. The enduring influence of the critical thinking experience is highlighted and implications for oncology nursing practice are discussed. The purpose of the project was to enhance competency in critical thinking and foster change in clinical practice. Small discussion groups of inpatient and outpatient nurses, facilitated by clinical educators, critically analyzed a videotape compiled from interviews with six oncology patients. The patients had been asked to describe their experience of living with cancer. The ONS 14 high-incidence problem areas provided the framework for organizing the interview excerpts, and video collages were developed to support a 4-year clinical education plan. Brief biographies and treatment histories were used to frame each patient's experience. A facilitator guide was formulated specific to disease pathophysiology, diagnostic work-up, staging, psychosocial adjustment, and treatment regimens and their complications. Evidence-based nursing strategies were stressed. The nurses shared clinical anecdotes, insights, and learning with colleagues as they reflected on the rich dimensions of patient and family experience portrayed. The 2-hour module created a unique opportunity for nurses to translate patient experiences into new clinical realities. Evaluation data were obtained immediately after and at one year following the sessions. Scaled self-report responses indicated the sessions positively affected daily practice through enhanced communication skills and oncology knowledge, strengthened relationships with colleagues, and improved patient and family teaching. Themes of enhanced sensitivity to patient and family experience, a broadened oncology knowledge base, and a heightened sense of self-confidence and esteem for colleagues emerged from the qualitative data. The use of a didactic method, grounded in patient stories, provides an engaging and non-threatening opportunity for nurses to experience shared learning. Critical thinking is enhanced when it is based in clinical reality and directly applicable to each nurseÆs practice. This innovative approach of thoughtful clinical inquiry is relevant for all dimensions of oncology nursing.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIMPACT OF AN ONCOLOGY NURSING CRITICAL THINKING PROJECTen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWestlake, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorDelzer,Nancyen_US
dc.contributor.authorOÆConnell, Pattyen_US
dc.contributor.authorQuinn-Casper, Patriciaen_US
dc.author.detailsSusan Westlake, PhD RN AOCNS, Oncology Clinical Nurse Specialist, Columbia St. Mary's, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, email: swestlak@columbia-stmarys.org; Nancy Delzer, MBA, MSN; Patty O'Connell, BS, BSN; Patricia Quinn-Casper, MSN, MAPSen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164741-
dc.description.abstractThe ability to think critically, and sensitively, is an essential component of competent oncology nursing practice. The impact of an innovative project designed to foster such thinking is examined in the one-year evaluation data from 90 nurses. The enduring influence of the critical thinking experience is highlighted and implications for oncology nursing practice are discussed. The purpose of the project was to enhance competency in critical thinking and foster change in clinical practice. Small discussion groups of inpatient and outpatient nurses, facilitated by clinical educators, critically analyzed a videotape compiled from interviews with six oncology patients. The patients had been asked to describe their experience of living with cancer. The ONS 14 high-incidence problem areas provided the framework for organizing the interview excerpts, and video collages were developed to support a 4-year clinical education plan. Brief biographies and treatment histories were used to frame each patient's experience. A facilitator guide was formulated specific to disease pathophysiology, diagnostic work-up, staging, psychosocial adjustment, and treatment regimens and their complications. Evidence-based nursing strategies were stressed. The nurses shared clinical anecdotes, insights, and learning with colleagues as they reflected on the rich dimensions of patient and family experience portrayed. The 2-hour module created a unique opportunity for nurses to translate patient experiences into new clinical realities. Evaluation data were obtained immediately after and at one year following the sessions. Scaled self-report responses indicated the sessions positively affected daily practice through enhanced communication skills and oncology knowledge, strengthened relationships with colleagues, and improved patient and family teaching. Themes of enhanced sensitivity to patient and family experience, a broadened oncology knowledge base, and a heightened sense of self-confidence and esteem for colleagues emerged from the qualitative data. The use of a didactic method, grounded in patient stories, provides an engaging and non-threatening opportunity for nurses to experience shared learning. Critical thinking is enhanced when it is based in clinical reality and directly applicable to each nurseÆs practice. This innovative approach of thoughtful clinical inquiry is relevant for all dimensions of oncology nursing.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:06:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:06:07Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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