A NEW TECHNIQUE FOR TREATING VOCAL CORD PARALYSIS: WHAT ONCOLOGY NURSES SHOULD KNOW

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164744
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A NEW TECHNIQUE FOR TREATING VOCAL CORD PARALYSIS: WHAT ONCOLOGY NURSES SHOULD KNOW
Author(s):
Zeuren, Rebecca; Kasparian, Janine
Author Details:
Rebecca Zeuren, RN BSN, RN, Office Practice Nurse, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, email: zeurenr@mskcc.org; Janine Kasparian, RN, BSN
Abstract:
Vocal cords are critical for clear phonation, protection of the trachea from aspiration, and effective cough production. When a vocal cord is paralyzed it is unable to abduct and adduct and therefore creates a small gap. This may cause hoarseness, inability to communicate, shortness of breathe, and aspiration. There are many known causes of vocal cord paralysis. The two most common are lung malignancy and surgically-induced injury. Vocal cord injection may alleviate these problems associated with paralysis. It is important for nurses to be aware of this treatment option for their patients. This presentation will educate nurses about vocal cord paralysis and the vocal cord injection technique. The risks and benefits, procedure details, and nursing implications will be described. After the patientÆs throat is locally anesthetized, one physician inserts a fiberoptic scope for visualization of the vocal cords. A second physician palpates external landmarks, preps the skin, and inserts a needle into the thyroarytenoid/ vocalis muscle. A human tissue or synthetic product is injected into the tissue pushing the vocal cord medially. The nurse observes the patient for adverse reactions and provides post-procedure instructions. Vocal cord injections are generally effective for four to six months with a low risk of side effects. Improvement may be observed immediately, with progressive improvement over the next few days. It is minimally invasive, less costly than open surgical techniques, and can be especially effective in improving the quality of life for patients with advanced disease who are unable to undergo anesthesia. Any oncology patient may be affected by vocal cord paralysis as a result of their disease or treatment. It is imperative for oncology nurses to be educated about this problem and the potential benefits of vocal cord injection. This will allow the practitioner to identify patients who may benefit from this procedure.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA NEW TECHNIQUE FOR TREATING VOCAL CORD PARALYSIS: WHAT ONCOLOGY NURSES SHOULD KNOWen_GB
dc.contributor.authorZeuren, Rebeccaen_US
dc.contributor.authorKasparian, Janineen_US
dc.author.detailsRebecca Zeuren, RN BSN, RN, Office Practice Nurse, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, email: zeurenr@mskcc.org; Janine Kasparian, RN, BSNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164744-
dc.description.abstractVocal cords are critical for clear phonation, protection of the trachea from aspiration, and effective cough production. When a vocal cord is paralyzed it is unable to abduct and adduct and therefore creates a small gap. This may cause hoarseness, inability to communicate, shortness of breathe, and aspiration. There are many known causes of vocal cord paralysis. The two most common are lung malignancy and surgically-induced injury. Vocal cord injection may alleviate these problems associated with paralysis. It is important for nurses to be aware of this treatment option for their patients. This presentation will educate nurses about vocal cord paralysis and the vocal cord injection technique. The risks and benefits, procedure details, and nursing implications will be described. After the patientÆs throat is locally anesthetized, one physician inserts a fiberoptic scope for visualization of the vocal cords. A second physician palpates external landmarks, preps the skin, and inserts a needle into the thyroarytenoid/ vocalis muscle. A human tissue or synthetic product is injected into the tissue pushing the vocal cord medially. The nurse observes the patient for adverse reactions and provides post-procedure instructions. Vocal cord injections are generally effective for four to six months with a low risk of side effects. Improvement may be observed immediately, with progressive improvement over the next few days. It is minimally invasive, less costly than open surgical techniques, and can be especially effective in improving the quality of life for patients with advanced disease who are unable to undergo anesthesia. Any oncology patient may be affected by vocal cord paralysis as a result of their disease or treatment. It is imperative for oncology nurses to be educated about this problem and the potential benefits of vocal cord injection. This will allow the practitioner to identify patients who may benefit from this procedure.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:06:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:06:10Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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