Cisplatin: Evaluating the Current Standard of Hydration for Cisplatin Administration

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164745
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cisplatin: Evaluating the Current Standard of Hydration for Cisplatin Administration
Author(s):
Albanese, Patricia; Thom, Bridget; Kline, Nancy
Author Details:
Patricia Albanese, RN, OCN,Clinical Nurse III, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York City, New York, USA, email:albanesp@mskcc.org; Bridget Thom, MS; Nancy Kline, PhD, RN, CPNP, FAAN
Abstract:
Research Study: The current standard of high-volume hydration for cisplatin administration, based on the potential for renal damage, was implemented prior to the availability of improved anti-emetic drugs. However, with the use of Aloxi, Emend, and dexamethasone, acute and delayed emesis is better contolled, allowing patients to maintain adequate oral intake during and after cisplatin administration. The retrospective chart review sought to describe the amount of oral hydration patients receiving cisplatin can tolerate. Pilot data attained from this review will be used as rationale for a future study to determine if patients can maintain adequate oral hydration with a modified amount of IV hydration. RoyÆs Adaptation Model describes the person as continually interacting with a changing enviroment who uses coping mechanisms to respond to enviromental stressors. For purpose of this review, the enviromental stressor is the potential for renal damage from cisplatin therapy and the coping mechanism is adequate self-hydration. The medical records of all patients undergoing treatment for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCL) during their first cycle of moderate dose cisplatin from September 2007-May 2008 were reviewed,yielding a sample of 81 patients. Variables of interest included oral and intravenous intake and output in milliliters and creatine levels prior to starting initial chemotherapy and 3 weeks after cisplatin administration. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Oral hydration levels ranged from 200 ml to 3850 ml. On average, patients were able to take in 1299 ml of oral hydration (sd=627).Total intake including IV hydration, ranged from 2812 ml to 6586 ml with a mean of 3970 ml (sd=726 ml). Based on creatine levels,no patient experienced nephrotoxicity (mean =.93 ml, sd=.26, range=0.5, 1.3). The findings suggest that patients are able to adequately selfhydrate during and after cisplatin administration. As such, the findings support an additional study that addresses whether rigorous IV hydration can be manipulated without compromising kidney function, with the ultimate goal of decreasing chair time in the outpatient unit, which impacts patient satisfaction and quality of life without compromising patient safety.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCisplatin: Evaluating the Current Standard of Hydration for Cisplatin Administrationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAlbanese, Patriciaen_US
dc.contributor.authorThom, Bridgeten_US
dc.contributor.authorKline, Nancyen_US
dc.author.detailsPatricia Albanese, RN, OCN,Clinical Nurse III, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York City, New York, USA, email:albanesp@mskcc.org; Bridget Thom, MS; Nancy Kline, PhD, RN, CPNP, FAANen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164745-
dc.description.abstractResearch Study: The current standard of high-volume hydration for cisplatin administration, based on the potential for renal damage, was implemented prior to the availability of improved anti-emetic drugs. However, with the use of Aloxi, Emend, and dexamethasone, acute and delayed emesis is better contolled, allowing patients to maintain adequate oral intake during and after cisplatin administration. The retrospective chart review sought to describe the amount of oral hydration patients receiving cisplatin can tolerate. Pilot data attained from this review will be used as rationale for a future study to determine if patients can maintain adequate oral hydration with a modified amount of IV hydration. RoyÆs Adaptation Model describes the person as continually interacting with a changing enviroment who uses coping mechanisms to respond to enviromental stressors. For purpose of this review, the enviromental stressor is the potential for renal damage from cisplatin therapy and the coping mechanism is adequate self-hydration. The medical records of all patients undergoing treatment for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCL) during their first cycle of moderate dose cisplatin from September 2007-May 2008 were reviewed,yielding a sample of 81 patients. Variables of interest included oral and intravenous intake and output in milliliters and creatine levels prior to starting initial chemotherapy and 3 weeks after cisplatin administration. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Oral hydration levels ranged from 200 ml to 3850 ml. On average, patients were able to take in 1299 ml of oral hydration (sd=627).Total intake including IV hydration, ranged from 2812 ml to 6586 ml with a mean of 3970 ml (sd=726 ml). Based on creatine levels,no patient experienced nephrotoxicity (mean =.93 ml, sd=.26, range=0.5, 1.3). The findings suggest that patients are able to adequately selfhydrate during and after cisplatin administration. As such, the findings support an additional study that addresses whether rigorous IV hydration can be manipulated without compromising kidney function, with the ultimate goal of decreasing chair time in the outpatient unit, which impacts patient satisfaction and quality of life without compromising patient safety.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:06:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:06:11Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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