Ambulatory Cancer Pain Management: A Feasibility Study of Multisite Nursing Collaborative Research

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164748
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Ambulatory Cancer Pain Management: A Feasibility Study of Multisite Nursing Collaborative Research
Author(s):
Broxson, Anita; Williams, Lori; Tamayo, Geline; Ownby, Kristin; McNeill, Jeanette
Author Details:
Anita Broxson, RN, MSN, OCN, Program Director, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: abroxson@mdanderson.org; Lori Williams, RN, PhD; Tito Mendoza, PhD; Geline Tamayo, RN, MSN; Kristin Ownby, RN, PhD, U. of Texas SON, Houston, Texas; Jeanette McNeill, PhD, U. of the Incarnate Word, San Antonio, Texas
Abstract:
Research Study: Many patients with cancer (14-100%) continue to suffer unnecessarily from pain. Research in the area of pain management is relevant to oncology nursing because oncology nurses are most often the first to identify or suspect that a patient is in pain. This places her/him in the unique position to assess patients' knowledge of pain management and to follow-up with appropriate pain education. This education should be based on evidence from nursing research. The purpose of this study is to examine the feasibility of a nursing research effort to collect pain and concurrent symptom data across five institutions. Such research reflects the ONS Research Agenda content area of research in cancer symptoms, side effects, and symptom clusters. The Symptom Management Model guided the investigation into the incidence and severity of pain and other symptoms potentially experienced by the participants. The model's three interrelated dimensions include the symptom experience, symptom management strategies, and outcomes. Participants with breast, colorectal, lung, or prostate cancer who were undergoing chemotherapy were recruited by members of the research team. After providing written, IRB-approved informed consent, participants completed the M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory, the Brief Pain Inventory body outline, the American Pain Society Patient Outcome Questionnaire, the Barriers Questionnaire II, and a demographic information questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze responses. A brief open-ended questionnaire was administered to nurses participating in the study to solicit feedback about the experience of multisite research. The most frequently occurring challenges experienced by the researchers in recruitment of participants included allotting time away from regular duties, identifying other nurses who could assist them, and a lack of support at the study site. Findings from the 53 patient participants revealed the most frequently reported symptoms were pain, fatigue, and sleep disturbance, while the highest-rated patient barrier to adequate pain management was fear of physiological effects from pain medications. Lessons learned provide valuable information for the design of future multisite research. The need for further investigation into pain and symptom clusters is warranted.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: Grant from the Houston Chapter of the Oncology Nursing Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAmbulatory Cancer Pain Management: A Feasibility Study of Multisite Nursing Collaborative Researchen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBroxson, Anitaen_US
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Lorien_US
dc.contributor.authorTamayo, Gelineen_US
dc.contributor.authorOwnby, Kristinen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcNeill, Jeanetteen_US
dc.author.detailsAnita Broxson, RN, MSN, OCN, Program Director, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: abroxson@mdanderson.org; Lori Williams, RN, PhD; Tito Mendoza, PhD; Geline Tamayo, RN, MSN; Kristin Ownby, RN, PhD, U. of Texas SON, Houston, Texas; Jeanette McNeill, PhD, U. of the Incarnate Word, San Antonio, Texasen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164748-
dc.description.abstractResearch Study: Many patients with cancer (14-100%) continue to suffer unnecessarily from pain. Research in the area of pain management is relevant to oncology nursing because oncology nurses are most often the first to identify or suspect that a patient is in pain. This places her/him in the unique position to assess patients' knowledge of pain management and to follow-up with appropriate pain education. This education should be based on evidence from nursing research. The purpose of this study is to examine the feasibility of a nursing research effort to collect pain and concurrent symptom data across five institutions. Such research reflects the ONS Research Agenda content area of research in cancer symptoms, side effects, and symptom clusters. The Symptom Management Model guided the investigation into the incidence and severity of pain and other symptoms potentially experienced by the participants. The model's three interrelated dimensions include the symptom experience, symptom management strategies, and outcomes. Participants with breast, colorectal, lung, or prostate cancer who were undergoing chemotherapy were recruited by members of the research team. After providing written, IRB-approved informed consent, participants completed the M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory, the Brief Pain Inventory body outline, the American Pain Society Patient Outcome Questionnaire, the Barriers Questionnaire II, and a demographic information questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze responses. A brief open-ended questionnaire was administered to nurses participating in the study to solicit feedback about the experience of multisite research. The most frequently occurring challenges experienced by the researchers in recruitment of participants included allotting time away from regular duties, identifying other nurses who could assist them, and a lack of support at the study site. Findings from the 53 patient participants revealed the most frequently reported symptoms were pain, fatigue, and sleep disturbance, while the highest-rated patient barrier to adequate pain management was fear of physiological effects from pain medications. Lessons learned provide valuable information for the design of future multisite research. The need for further investigation into pain and symptom clusters is warranted.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:06:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:06:15Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: Grant from the Houston Chapter of the Oncology Nursing Society-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.