Development of an Orientation program in a BMT Unit: Integrating a large group of GNs while Retaining Existing Staff Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164750
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Development of an Orientation program in a BMT Unit: Integrating a large group of GNs while Retaining Existing Staff Nurses
Author(s):
Kumpf, Rose; Privitere, Lisa; Mombrea,Bonny
Author Details:
Rose Kumpf, RN, OCN, Clinical Nursing Supervisor, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York, USA, email: kumpf@verizon.net; Lisa Privitere, RN; Cindy Latimore, RN; Bonny Mombrea, RN
Abstract:
Education: The enculturation of graduate nurses to a high acuity patient care setting provided the Nurse Administrators of this eighteen bed Blood and Marrow Transplant (BMT) unit with significant challenges. Sixteen nurses were hired over a three-month period. Fourteen of the sixteen nurses that were hired were unlicensed graduate nurses. These sixteen new nurses were assigned to work with the twenty-five experienced nurses who remained on the unit. Significant concerns were raised about the ability of the BMT program and the Department of Nursing to support the differing needs of the new and experienced nurses while maintaining quality patient care. A new approach to the orientation and education for the new staff nurses was identified. After completing the general nursing orientation, these nurses were assigned to attend additional classes specific to the BMT curriculum. Mini education sessions were conducted by the Assistant Nurse Administrator. These modules involved a short lecture in which some return demonstrations were required. Lists of medications were compiled, categorized, and distributed to each nurse and each drug was reviewed in the didactic sessions. Policies and SOPs were presented, reviewed and discussed in detail. Patient care procedures were extensively demonstrated and return demonstrations critiqued. This process provided support to the experienced nurses who had been continuously precepting new staff nurses. It gave the new nurses essential knowledge and skills to engage in direct patient care. It also provides a venue to assure that consistent and correct information was being relayed. The graduate nurses were immediately able to demonstrate the necessary skills that were applicable to their scope of practice with confidence and the ability to advance to more complex patient care. The preceptors appreciated the ability to work with the new nurses on direct patient care rather than the fundamentals. A subsequent evaluation of the program indicated that the new nurses experienced a greater confidence in their initial skills as the experienced nurses identified a more gratifying preceptor experience. As a result of this program a significant increase in the number of nurses retained was realized.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDevelopment of an Orientation program in a BMT Unit: Integrating a large group of GNs while Retaining Existing Staff Nursesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKumpf, Roseen_US
dc.contributor.authorPrivitere, Lisaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMombrea,Bonnyen_US
dc.author.detailsRose Kumpf, RN, OCN, Clinical Nursing Supervisor, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York, USA, email: kumpf@verizon.net; Lisa Privitere, RN; Cindy Latimore, RN; Bonny Mombrea, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164750-
dc.description.abstractEducation: The enculturation of graduate nurses to a high acuity patient care setting provided the Nurse Administrators of this eighteen bed Blood and Marrow Transplant (BMT) unit with significant challenges. Sixteen nurses were hired over a three-month period. Fourteen of the sixteen nurses that were hired were unlicensed graduate nurses. These sixteen new nurses were assigned to work with the twenty-five experienced nurses who remained on the unit. Significant concerns were raised about the ability of the BMT program and the Department of Nursing to support the differing needs of the new and experienced nurses while maintaining quality patient care. A new approach to the orientation and education for the new staff nurses was identified. After completing the general nursing orientation, these nurses were assigned to attend additional classes specific to the BMT curriculum. Mini education sessions were conducted by the Assistant Nurse Administrator. These modules involved a short lecture in which some return demonstrations were required. Lists of medications were compiled, categorized, and distributed to each nurse and each drug was reviewed in the didactic sessions. Policies and SOPs were presented, reviewed and discussed in detail. Patient care procedures were extensively demonstrated and return demonstrations critiqued. This process provided support to the experienced nurses who had been continuously precepting new staff nurses. It gave the new nurses essential knowledge and skills to engage in direct patient care. It also provides a venue to assure that consistent and correct information was being relayed. The graduate nurses were immediately able to demonstrate the necessary skills that were applicable to their scope of practice with confidence and the ability to advance to more complex patient care. The preceptors appreciated the ability to work with the new nurses on direct patient care rather than the fundamentals. A subsequent evaluation of the program indicated that the new nurses experienced a greater confidence in their initial skills as the experienced nurses identified a more gratifying preceptor experience. As a result of this program a significant increase in the number of nurses retained was realized.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:06:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:06:17Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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