2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164752
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Outcomes of an Intentional Afternoon Quiet Hour for Patients and Nurses
Author(s):
Lane, Mary; Rea, Ruth
Author Details:
Mary Lane, MN, OCN, Staff RN, Providence St. Peter Hospital, Olympia, Washington, USA, email: mary.lane@providence.org; Ruth Rea, PhD, RN, U. of Washington, Tacoma, Washington
Abstract:
Research Study: Hospital environmental noise has been implicated as an adverse factor that contributes to patients' sleep deprivation and inability to rest. The association between noise and sleep is important to nursing as the lack of adequate amounts of sleep has corresponded with poor patient outcomes. Patients may experience sleep deprivation which increases immunosuppression, lower pain tolerance, increase anxiety, and fatigue. Noise levels impact staff by contributing to increase stress, impaired communication, and have been associated with increase medical errors and staff burnout. Oncology patients are particularly vulnerable to sleep deprivation as they generally have longer length of stays and would benefit from interventions to promote rest. The purpose of this study was to determine if an intentional quiet hour would be helpful to both patients and nursing staff on a hospital oncology unit. The objectives of this study align with the ONS research priorities focusing on nursing sensitive patient outcomes as well as research that support symptom management. The study used a descriptive design to collect perceptions about the helpfulness of an intentional quiet hour from patients and staff RNs. The investigator developed the tools for data collection which consisted of two 10-item questionnaires specific for patients and nurses. Data analysis was performed using SPSS version 14. Wilcoxon Signed Ranks-Tests were performed to test for differences Seventeen inpatients participated with 52.9% reporting the intervention as 'helpful to very helpful.' The patients reported a significant difference (p<.005) in the noise level during the quiet hour and average unit noise. Nursing outcomes were pertinent to work environment and time management issues with 60% of the nurses (n=15) reporting the implementation of the quiet hour assisted with completion of work assignments (p<.004). Thirteen (p<.001) reported experiencing an increase in the likelihood of an uninterrupted lunch break; as well as an overall improvement in the unit noise level during this hour. It was also noted that after implementation of the quiet hour, patient satisfaction scores relating to noise improved significantly. This research demonstrated the helpfulness of a cost-effective nursing intervention which benefits patients and staff by improving quality, safety, and satisfaction.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOutcomes of an Intentional Afternoon Quiet Hour for Patients and Nursesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLane, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.authorRea, Ruthen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Lane, MN, OCN, Staff RN, Providence St. Peter Hospital, Olympia, Washington, USA, email: mary.lane@providence.org; Ruth Rea, PhD, RN, U. of Washington, Tacoma, Washingtonen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164752-
dc.description.abstractResearch Study: Hospital environmental noise has been implicated as an adverse factor that contributes to patients' sleep deprivation and inability to rest. The association between noise and sleep is important to nursing as the lack of adequate amounts of sleep has corresponded with poor patient outcomes. Patients may experience sleep deprivation which increases immunosuppression, lower pain tolerance, increase anxiety, and fatigue. Noise levels impact staff by contributing to increase stress, impaired communication, and have been associated with increase medical errors and staff burnout. Oncology patients are particularly vulnerable to sleep deprivation as they generally have longer length of stays and would benefit from interventions to promote rest. The purpose of this study was to determine if an intentional quiet hour would be helpful to both patients and nursing staff on a hospital oncology unit. The objectives of this study align with the ONS research priorities focusing on nursing sensitive patient outcomes as well as research that support symptom management. The study used a descriptive design to collect perceptions about the helpfulness of an intentional quiet hour from patients and staff RNs. The investigator developed the tools for data collection which consisted of two 10-item questionnaires specific for patients and nurses. Data analysis was performed using SPSS version 14. Wilcoxon Signed Ranks-Tests were performed to test for differences Seventeen inpatients participated with 52.9% reporting the intervention as 'helpful to very helpful.' The patients reported a significant difference (p&lt;.005) in the noise level during the quiet hour and average unit noise. Nursing outcomes were pertinent to work environment and time management issues with 60% of the nurses (n=15) reporting the implementation of the quiet hour assisted with completion of work assignments (p&lt;.004). Thirteen (p&lt;.001) reported experiencing an increase in the likelihood of an uninterrupted lunch break; as well as an overall improvement in the unit noise level during this hour. It was also noted that after implementation of the quiet hour, patient satisfaction scores relating to noise improved significantly. This research demonstrated the helpfulness of a cost-effective nursing intervention which benefits patients and staff by improving quality, safety, and satisfaction.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:06:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:06:20Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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