2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164755
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sacred Encounters: Creating a Culture of Care
Author(s):
Lenhart, Wendy; Vollmond, Michelle; Allen, Linnell; Noakes, Mary; Melford, June; Drake, Diana
Author Details:
Wendy Lenhart, RN, OCN, Charge nurse, Mission Hospital Regional Medical Center, Mission Viejo, California, USA, email: nursepooh@cox.net; Michelle Vollmond, RN, OCN; Linnell Allen, RN; Mary Noakes, BSN, RN, OCN; June Melford, RN, MSN; Diane Drake, PhD, RN
Abstract:
Administration/Leadership Development: Cancer patients and their families can experience significant physical, emotional and spiritual distress. Providing a vision that supports nursing care of the patient and family is an important administrative and leadership responsibility. In 2007, three strategic goals - perfect care, sacred encounters and healthy communities were initiated by the St. Joseph Health System. In 2008, actualization of the concept of sacred encounters resonated with oncology nurses who work on a blended adult medical oncology inpatient unit. The overall purpose of the project was to integrate the vision of sacred encounters with oncology nursing practice. The theory of Integral Nursing was selected as the conceptual model to explain the integration of sacred encounters within the dynamic relationships of system structures, shared values, and nursing practice. The definition of sacred encounters of providing care that promotes a healing partnership of love and care, leading to optimal patient, family and caregiver relationships and experiences was reviewed by the cancer nursing staff. The word sacred is an acronym for the concepts representing shared values of: sensitive, attentive, compassionate, respectful, engaged and dignity. Nursing practice of sacred encounters was identified as interventions that included: narrative written stories by nurses to share examples of sacred encounters; development of a service standard for all nurses to state their name, occupation, duties, and smile when encountering patients and families; patient care rounding by bedside and manager nurses; individualized patient plan of care communicated each shift on bedside white boards; and a commitment to compassionate end of life care through a program called No One Dies Alone. The administrative vision of sacred encounters was successfully initiated in cancer nursing practice. Patient satisfaction scores,(indicators sensitive to the concept of sacred encounters) have improved since the initiation of this project Cancer nursing practice is integral to the caring culture created in the hospital work environment. Oncology nurses can implement strategies with measurable impact on patient outcomes and influence optimal relationships which promote a culture sensitive to the needs of patients. Ongoing identification of interventions that promote sacred encounters will enhance cancer nursing practice.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSacred Encounters: Creating a Culture of Careen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLenhart, Wendyen_US
dc.contributor.authorVollmond, Michelleen_US
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Linnellen_US
dc.contributor.authorNoakes, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.authorMelford, Juneen_US
dc.contributor.authorDrake, Dianaen_US
dc.author.detailsWendy Lenhart, RN, OCN, Charge nurse, Mission Hospital Regional Medical Center, Mission Viejo, California, USA, email: nursepooh@cox.net; Michelle Vollmond, RN, OCN; Linnell Allen, RN; Mary Noakes, BSN, RN, OCN; June Melford, RN, MSN; Diane Drake, PhD, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164755-
dc.description.abstractAdministration/Leadership Development: Cancer patients and their families can experience significant physical, emotional and spiritual distress. Providing a vision that supports nursing care of the patient and family is an important administrative and leadership responsibility. In 2007, three strategic goals - perfect care, sacred encounters and healthy communities were initiated by the St. Joseph Health System. In 2008, actualization of the concept of sacred encounters resonated with oncology nurses who work on a blended adult medical oncology inpatient unit. The overall purpose of the project was to integrate the vision of sacred encounters with oncology nursing practice. The theory of Integral Nursing was selected as the conceptual model to explain the integration of sacred encounters within the dynamic relationships of system structures, shared values, and nursing practice. The definition of sacred encounters of providing care that promotes a healing partnership of love and care, leading to optimal patient, family and caregiver relationships and experiences was reviewed by the cancer nursing staff. The word sacred is an acronym for the concepts representing shared values of: sensitive, attentive, compassionate, respectful, engaged and dignity. Nursing practice of sacred encounters was identified as interventions that included: narrative written stories by nurses to share examples of sacred encounters; development of a service standard for all nurses to state their name, occupation, duties, and smile when encountering patients and families; patient care rounding by bedside and manager nurses; individualized patient plan of care communicated each shift on bedside white boards; and a commitment to compassionate end of life care through a program called No One Dies Alone. The administrative vision of sacred encounters was successfully initiated in cancer nursing practice. Patient satisfaction scores,(indicators sensitive to the concept of sacred encounters) have improved since the initiation of this project Cancer nursing practice is integral to the caring culture created in the hospital work environment. Oncology nurses can implement strategies with measurable impact on patient outcomes and influence optimal relationships which promote a culture sensitive to the needs of patients. Ongoing identification of interventions that promote sacred encounters will enhance cancer nursing practice.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:06:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:06:23Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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