Novel Strategies for Optimal Peripheral Stem Cell Collections for Autologous Transplants

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164758
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Novel Strategies for Optimal Peripheral Stem Cell Collections for Autologous Transplants
Author(s):
Lichvar, Margaret; Brown, Amy; Kilgore, Sue Ann
Author Details:
Margaret Lichvar, RN, Clinical Consent Nurse, Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, USA, email: plichvar@cox.net; Amy Brown, RN, BSN, OCN; Sue Ann Kilgore, RN, MSN
Abstract:
Clinical/Evidence Based Practice: Collecting peripheral stem cells for transplantation is time consuming and expensive. It involves approximately four hours per apheresis collection, with an average cost of $5000 per collection. In addition, three to six collections are often required. The overall cost of apheresis includes charges for supplies, labor, and medications. In addition, patients experience long and cumbersome treatment processes. Our goal was to predict the best time for each patient's stem cell collection, thereby decreasing the number of collections required. We observed formally that (1) relying solely on white blood counts (WBCs) to determine collection times often yielded insufficient harvests, and (2) maximum cell harvests were often obtained when peripheral CD34 counts were above 20,000/ml. Therefore, we designed a flow process to utilize both WBCs and peripheral CD34 counts to predict the best collection time. To identify optimal assessment of WBCs and CD34 counts, tracking forms were created. These forms provided evidence based standards of care for when counts should be checked, and when collection should be initiated to yield the greatest progenitor cell harvest. This included collections following mobilization utilizing growth factors alone or with chemotherapy. They also provided the nurses with valuable data on each patient, so consistent care was followed throughout the collection process. In addition, the use of larger-gauge catheters, which allowed the processing of significantly greater blood volumes per apheresis, was implemented to further improve our collection process. Utilizing these strategies, the number of apheresis procedures has greatly decreased, resulting in an average savings of $15,000 per patient. Additional cost savings were seen in decreased workloads for all team members and reduced treatment exposure for patients. Continuity of patient care and patient satisfaction also improved. This process was originally implemented with multiple myeloma patients and later modified and applied to patients with all diseases collecting for autologous transplants with the same successful results. We believe that other autologous transplant programs may benefit from implementing this evidence-based process.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNovel Strategies for Optimal Peripheral Stem Cell Collections for Autologous Transplantsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLichvar, Margareten_US
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Amyen_US
dc.contributor.authorKilgore, Sue Annen_US
dc.author.detailsMargaret Lichvar, RN, Clinical Consent Nurse, Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, USA, email: plichvar@cox.net; Amy Brown, RN, BSN, OCN; Sue Ann Kilgore, RN, MSNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164758-
dc.description.abstractClinical/Evidence Based Practice: Collecting peripheral stem cells for transplantation is time consuming and expensive. It involves approximately four hours per apheresis collection, with an average cost of $5000 per collection. In addition, three to six collections are often required. The overall cost of apheresis includes charges for supplies, labor, and medications. In addition, patients experience long and cumbersome treatment processes. Our goal was to predict the best time for each patient's stem cell collection, thereby decreasing the number of collections required. We observed formally that (1) relying solely on white blood counts (WBCs) to determine collection times often yielded insufficient harvests, and (2) maximum cell harvests were often obtained when peripheral CD34 counts were above 20,000/ml. Therefore, we designed a flow process to utilize both WBCs and peripheral CD34 counts to predict the best collection time. To identify optimal assessment of WBCs and CD34 counts, tracking forms were created. These forms provided evidence based standards of care for when counts should be checked, and when collection should be initiated to yield the greatest progenitor cell harvest. This included collections following mobilization utilizing growth factors alone or with chemotherapy. They also provided the nurses with valuable data on each patient, so consistent care was followed throughout the collection process. In addition, the use of larger-gauge catheters, which allowed the processing of significantly greater blood volumes per apheresis, was implemented to further improve our collection process. Utilizing these strategies, the number of apheresis procedures has greatly decreased, resulting in an average savings of $15,000 per patient. Additional cost savings were seen in decreased workloads for all team members and reduced treatment exposure for patients. Continuity of patient care and patient satisfaction also improved. This process was originally implemented with multiple myeloma patients and later modified and applied to patients with all diseases collecting for autologous transplants with the same successful results. We believe that other autologous transplant programs may benefit from implementing this evidence-based process.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:06:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:06:27Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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