Association of maternal uncertainty and distress with quality of life and hope

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164760
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Association of maternal uncertainty and distress with quality of life and hope
Author(s):
Liu, Ying-Mei
Author Details:
Ying-Mei Liu, Instructor,Chang Gung Institute of Technology, Kwei-Shan, Taoyuan, Taiwan, email: ymliu@mail.cgit.edu.tw
Abstract:
Research Study: When one of their children is diagnosed with cancer, most parents are devastated. As they confront the life-threatening event parents experience uncertainty and distress about the future health of their child. The presence of continued distress has been associated with a chronic negative impact. Parental well-being is an important aspect of a family's adaptation to pediatric oncology. Research has yet to determine what allows some mothers to respond well and return to normal functioning after their childÆs treatment for cancer, while others have prolonged difficulties. It is important to identify those mothers who have greater uncertainty and distress and are at increased risk for poor outcomes. Study findings would allow for the creation of interventions that could facilitate and improve their coping. The purpose of this study was to identify uncertainty and distress in mothers of children with cancer, and analyze these relationships with quality of life and hope. Four well tested research instruments and one demographic questionnaire were administered to a sample of 200 mothers whose children with cancer. Instruments used included the Parental Perception of Uncertainty Scale, the Symptom Checklist 35 Revised, the Short Form 36 Health Survey, the Herth Hope Index, and a demographic questionnaire. Cluster analyses were used to identify subgroups of mothers of children with cancer regarding maternal perceived uncertainty and distress. Differences in demographic characteristics, and outcomes were evaluated using analysis of variance and chi square analysis. Four subgroups were identified by the cluster analyses. They include high uncertainty and high distress, moderate uncertainty and moderate distress, low uncertainty and low distress, and high uncertainty and low distress. The low uncertainty and low distress group reported the best maternal quality of life. Mothers in the low uncertainty and low distress subgroup had the highest hope, but no differences of hope were found among the other three subgroups. The findings of this study provide insight for pediatric oncology clinicians about specific areas of maternal concern. Guidance is offered for discussing issues related to uncertainty, distress, and quality of life with the mothers of their patients.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAssociation of maternal uncertainty and distress with quality of life and hopeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Ying-Meien_US
dc.author.detailsYing-Mei Liu, Instructor,Chang Gung Institute of Technology, Kwei-Shan, Taoyuan, Taiwan, email: ymliu@mail.cgit.edu.twen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164760-
dc.description.abstractResearch Study: When one of their children is diagnosed with cancer, most parents are devastated. As they confront the life-threatening event parents experience uncertainty and distress about the future health of their child. The presence of continued distress has been associated with a chronic negative impact. Parental well-being is an important aspect of a family's adaptation to pediatric oncology. Research has yet to determine what allows some mothers to respond well and return to normal functioning after their childÆs treatment for cancer, while others have prolonged difficulties. It is important to identify those mothers who have greater uncertainty and distress and are at increased risk for poor outcomes. Study findings would allow for the creation of interventions that could facilitate and improve their coping. The purpose of this study was to identify uncertainty and distress in mothers of children with cancer, and analyze these relationships with quality of life and hope. Four well tested research instruments and one demographic questionnaire were administered to a sample of 200 mothers whose children with cancer. Instruments used included the Parental Perception of Uncertainty Scale, the Symptom Checklist 35 Revised, the Short Form 36 Health Survey, the Herth Hope Index, and a demographic questionnaire. Cluster analyses were used to identify subgroups of mothers of children with cancer regarding maternal perceived uncertainty and distress. Differences in demographic characteristics, and outcomes were evaluated using analysis of variance and chi square analysis. Four subgroups were identified by the cluster analyses. They include high uncertainty and high distress, moderate uncertainty and moderate distress, low uncertainty and low distress, and high uncertainty and low distress. The low uncertainty and low distress group reported the best maternal quality of life. Mothers in the low uncertainty and low distress subgroup had the highest hope, but no differences of hope were found among the other three subgroups. The findings of this study provide insight for pediatric oncology clinicians about specific areas of maternal concern. Guidance is offered for discussing issues related to uncertainty, distress, and quality of life with the mothers of their patients.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:06:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:06:29Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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