Dietary Education of Patients Undergoing Gastrectomy and Transhiatal Esophagectomy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164770
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Dietary Education of Patients Undergoing Gastrectomy and Transhiatal Esophagectomy
Author(s):
Mcguire, Marlene; Huhmann, Maureen
Author Details:
Marlene Mcguire, RN, MA, APNBC, Advanced Practice Nurse, The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA, email: mcguirma@umdnj.edu; Maureen Huhmann, DCN, RD, CSO
Abstract:
Education: Surgical procedures for the treatment of gastric and esophageal cancers can severely impact a patient's nutritional status. Transhiatal esophagectomy is often performed for esophageal cancers, removing the esophagus and mobilizing the stomach into the chest cavity for esophageal replacement. It has been associated with complications such as dumping syndrome, delayed gastric emptying, outlet obstruction, and gastroesophageal reflux. Gastrectomy or removal of all or part of the stomach for treatment of gastric cancer is associated with the development of postgastrectomy syndrome which manifests as dumping syndrome, fat maldigestion, gastric stasis, and lactose intolerance. Vitamin B12 deficiencies can occur after gastrectomy due to loss of parietal cells, which are responsible for secreting an intrinsic factor that aids in absorption of B12. This often necessitates monthly intramuscular or nasal replacement of B12. Post-prandial dumping syndrome can be quite unpleasant for a patient due to rapid emptying of chyme into the intestines causing fluid shifts and intravascular depletion. This can cause the patients to experience dizziness, abdominal fullness, flushing, diarrhea, palpitations and nausea and vomiting. Nutritional counseling and patient education is essential in improving patient's quality of life and in minimizing complications from surgery. Nurses must be aware of anatomic and physiologic changes from surgery in order adequately educate the patient/ family. The goal was to prepare and educate patients and family for post-surgical dietary changes and lifestyle changes related to their procedure. An Advance Practice Nurse (APN) or a Registered Dietitian (RD) met with all appropriate patients prior to surgery, dispensed patient education materials and reviewed anticipated dietary changes. APNs or RD provided telephone support and follow up after discharge from the hospital and additional nutritional counseling. Postoperative weight was carefully monitored. Verbal feedback from patients was positive, with patients being able to verbalize an understanding of their surgery, anatomic/ physiologic changes, and describe necessary dietary changes. By developing a standardized approach to care, we were able to meet the needs of these patients and improve overall quality of life.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDietary Education of Patients Undergoing Gastrectomy and Transhiatal Esophagectomyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcguire, Marleneen_US
dc.contributor.authorHuhmann, Maureenen_US
dc.author.detailsMarlene Mcguire, RN, MA, APNBC, Advanced Practice Nurse, The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA, email: mcguirma@umdnj.edu; Maureen Huhmann, DCN, RD, CSOen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164770-
dc.description.abstractEducation: Surgical procedures for the treatment of gastric and esophageal cancers can severely impact a patient's nutritional status. Transhiatal esophagectomy is often performed for esophageal cancers, removing the esophagus and mobilizing the stomach into the chest cavity for esophageal replacement. It has been associated with complications such as dumping syndrome, delayed gastric emptying, outlet obstruction, and gastroesophageal reflux. Gastrectomy or removal of all or part of the stomach for treatment of gastric cancer is associated with the development of postgastrectomy syndrome which manifests as dumping syndrome, fat maldigestion, gastric stasis, and lactose intolerance. Vitamin B12 deficiencies can occur after gastrectomy due to loss of parietal cells, which are responsible for secreting an intrinsic factor that aids in absorption of B12. This often necessitates monthly intramuscular or nasal replacement of B12. Post-prandial dumping syndrome can be quite unpleasant for a patient due to rapid emptying of chyme into the intestines causing fluid shifts and intravascular depletion. This can cause the patients to experience dizziness, abdominal fullness, flushing, diarrhea, palpitations and nausea and vomiting. Nutritional counseling and patient education is essential in improving patient's quality of life and in minimizing complications from surgery. Nurses must be aware of anatomic and physiologic changes from surgery in order adequately educate the patient/ family. The goal was to prepare and educate patients and family for post-surgical dietary changes and lifestyle changes related to their procedure. An Advance Practice Nurse (APN) or a Registered Dietitian (RD) met with all appropriate patients prior to surgery, dispensed patient education materials and reviewed anticipated dietary changes. APNs or RD provided telephone support and follow up after discharge from the hospital and additional nutritional counseling. Postoperative weight was carefully monitored. Verbal feedback from patients was positive, with patients being able to verbalize an understanding of their surgery, anatomic/ physiologic changes, and describe necessary dietary changes. By developing a standardized approach to care, we were able to meet the needs of these patients and improve overall quality of life.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:06:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:06:41Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.