2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164773
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
CANCER SURVIVORS USE OF HEALTH-PROMOTING BEHAVIORS
Author(s):
Meraviglia, Martha; Morgan,Sherry; Stuifbergen, Alexa; Parson, Dawn
Author Details:
Martha Meraviglia,RN, CNS, PhD, Assistant Professor of Clinical Nursing, The University of Texas at Austin, School of Nursing, Austin, Texas, USA, email: mmeraviglia@mail.utexas.edu; Sherry Morgan, RN, BSN; Alexa Stuifbergen, PhD, RN; Dawn Parson, RN, BSN, Seton Health Care Network, Austin, Texas
Abstract:
Research Study: Many people in the U.S. have difficulty maintaining their health during the cancer experience because they encounter multiple barriers to acquiring or participating in health-promoting behaviors. Socioeconomic factors (e.g., low income and lack of health insurance) are especially difficult to overcome and are associated with lower use of health care, poorer overall health, and shortened survival. A recent report showed that only 7.4% of cancer survivors engage in HP behaviors. Identifying health-promoting (HP) behaviors of low-income survivors, a vulnerable population in oncology nursing, will benefit those with cancer by providing them with information and support to enhance their health and quality of life. The purpose of this study was to explore HP behaviors and their relationships to perceived health and quality of life. The conceptual framework is derived from Stuifbergen's explanatory model for health promotion within chronic conditions. After giving consent to participate, people who had been diagnosed with cancer at least six months completed a study packet assessing personal and cancer characteristics, HP behaviors (health responsibility, stress management, physical activity/ exercise, nutrition, interpersonal relations, and spiritual growth), self-efficacy for engaging in HP behaviors, outcome variables (physical and functional health, quality of life). Descriptive and multivariate statistics were conducted using SPSS. Fifty-one participants varied greatly in terms of age, ethnicity, education, marital and employment status. The majority described their physical health as fair with some disability (57%) and functional health as being able to do their usual activities (67%). Participants scored highest on the HP behaviors of health responsibility, interpersonal relations, and spiritual growth and lowest on stress management and physical activity/exercise. Several significant relationships were found between HP behaviors and outcome variables: physical activity/exercise and spiritual growth were positively related to physical health; stress management was positively related to social, emotional, and spiritual dimensions of quality of life; nutrition was positively related to emotional quality of life; interpersonal relations and spiritual growth were related to social, emotional, functional, and spiritual quality of life. These findings provide important information on the HP behaviors of low-income cancer survivors. Many cancer survivors engage in some HP behaviors following the diagnosis of their cancer with significant relationships existing between HP behaviors and perceived health and quality of life.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCANCER SURVIVORS USE OF HEALTH-PROMOTING BEHAVIORSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMeraviglia, Marthaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMorgan,Sherryen_US
dc.contributor.authorStuifbergen, Alexaen_US
dc.contributor.authorParson, Dawnen_US
dc.author.detailsMartha Meraviglia,RN, CNS, PhD, Assistant Professor of Clinical Nursing, The University of Texas at Austin, School of Nursing, Austin, Texas, USA, email: mmeraviglia@mail.utexas.edu; Sherry Morgan, RN, BSN; Alexa Stuifbergen, PhD, RN; Dawn Parson, RN, BSN, Seton Health Care Network, Austin, Texasen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164773-
dc.description.abstractResearch Study: Many people in the U.S. have difficulty maintaining their health during the cancer experience because they encounter multiple barriers to acquiring or participating in health-promoting behaviors. Socioeconomic factors (e.g., low income and lack of health insurance) are especially difficult to overcome and are associated with lower use of health care, poorer overall health, and shortened survival. A recent report showed that only 7.4% of cancer survivors engage in HP behaviors. Identifying health-promoting (HP) behaviors of low-income survivors, a vulnerable population in oncology nursing, will benefit those with cancer by providing them with information and support to enhance their health and quality of life. The purpose of this study was to explore HP behaviors and their relationships to perceived health and quality of life. The conceptual framework is derived from Stuifbergen's explanatory model for health promotion within chronic conditions. After giving consent to participate, people who had been diagnosed with cancer at least six months completed a study packet assessing personal and cancer characteristics, HP behaviors (health responsibility, stress management, physical activity/ exercise, nutrition, interpersonal relations, and spiritual growth), self-efficacy for engaging in HP behaviors, outcome variables (physical and functional health, quality of life). Descriptive and multivariate statistics were conducted using SPSS. Fifty-one participants varied greatly in terms of age, ethnicity, education, marital and employment status. The majority described their physical health as fair with some disability (57%) and functional health as being able to do their usual activities (67%). Participants scored highest on the HP behaviors of health responsibility, interpersonal relations, and spiritual growth and lowest on stress management and physical activity/exercise. Several significant relationships were found between HP behaviors and outcome variables: physical activity/exercise and spiritual growth were positively related to physical health; stress management was positively related to social, emotional, and spiritual dimensions of quality of life; nutrition was positively related to emotional quality of life; interpersonal relations and spiritual growth were related to social, emotional, functional, and spiritual quality of life. These findings provide important information on the HP behaviors of low-income cancer survivors. Many cancer survivors engage in some HP behaviors following the diagnosis of their cancer with significant relationships existing between HP behaviors and perceived health and quality of life.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:06:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:06:44Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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