COMPARISON OF PATIENT/PARTNER ROLE BY GENDER FOR GENERAL AND MENTAL HEALTH, DYADIC ADJUSTMENT AND DISTRESS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164779
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
COMPARISON OF PATIENT/PARTNER ROLE BY GENDER FOR GENERAL AND MENTAL HEALTH, DYADIC ADJUSTMENT AND DISTRESS
Author(s):
Morgan, Mary Ann; McMillan, Susan; Donovan, Kristine; Overcash, Janine
Author Details:
Mary Ann Morgan, PhD, ARNP, Survivorship Clinic, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida, USA, email: mary.morgan@moffitt.org; Susan McMillan, PhD, ARNP, U. of South Florida, Tampa, Florida; Kristine Donovan, PhD, MBA; Janine Overcash, PhD, ARNP, U. of So. Florida, Tampa, Florida; Brent Small, PhD, U. of So. Florida, Tampa, Florida
Abstract:
Research Study: Much of previous dyadic research, when one member has a diagnosis of cancer, has centered on disease-specific populations. This study included a symptom-defining population, patients with pain, who were in committed, intimate relationships. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of gender and patient/partner role on the quality of life of both members of the dyad. Quality of life outcomes included relationship quality, general health, mental health, and distress. The Stress Process Model guided the study. Being married is associated with lower mortality from a wide range of illnesses, but whether relationship quality rather than marital status influences outcomes is unknown. This was a secondary analysis of baseline data from a larger National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded pain and caregiver coping interventional study (5R01NR008270) using standard dyadic design that included 177 heterosexual couples in a committed relationship. Both the patient and partner completed the Dyadic Adjustment Scale, a measure of relationship quality, the Profile of Mood States (POMS) and the SF-36. Comparisons using MANOVA were examined for role (patient/partner) and gender differences. There were no significant effects for role or gender by selfreport on the POMS however, female patients approached significance (p = 0.058). Significant effects were found for patient/ partner role in mental health, physical health and dyadic adjustment. As expected, patientsÆ general health was lower with a mean of 51.82 (SD 17.88) compared to partnersÆ general health of 69.69 (SD 17.00). Patients had greater marital satisfaction (p < .011) with a mean of 121.82 (SD 14.96) compared to 118.88 (SD 15.94) for partners. There were significant role and gender effects (p < .015) for mental health. Female partner mean of 70.12 (SD 20.77) was closer to male patient mean of 68.82 (SD 20.35) and female patient mean of 66.77 (SD 19.42). Male partner mean of 77.12 (SD 15.60) indicated less discouragement than female partners. Partners of cancer patients frequently assume greater responsibilities and results suggest that partners should be supported as their lives undergo adaptations to the effects cancer has on the dyad.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCOMPARISON OF PATIENT/PARTNER ROLE BY GENDER FOR GENERAL AND MENTAL HEALTH, DYADIC ADJUSTMENT AND DISTRESSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Mary Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcMillan, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorDonovan, Kristineen_US
dc.contributor.authorOvercash, Janineen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Ann Morgan, PhD, ARNP, Survivorship Clinic, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida, USA, email: mary.morgan@moffitt.org; Susan McMillan, PhD, ARNP, U. of South Florida, Tampa, Florida; Kristine Donovan, PhD, MBA; Janine Overcash, PhD, ARNP, U. of So. Florida, Tampa, Florida; Brent Small, PhD, U. of So. Florida, Tampa, Floridaen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164779-
dc.description.abstractResearch Study: Much of previous dyadic research, when one member has a diagnosis of cancer, has centered on disease-specific populations. This study included a symptom-defining population, patients with pain, who were in committed, intimate relationships. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of gender and patient/partner role on the quality of life of both members of the dyad. Quality of life outcomes included relationship quality, general health, mental health, and distress. The Stress Process Model guided the study. Being married is associated with lower mortality from a wide range of illnesses, but whether relationship quality rather than marital status influences outcomes is unknown. This was a secondary analysis of baseline data from a larger National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded pain and caregiver coping interventional study (5R01NR008270) using standard dyadic design that included 177 heterosexual couples in a committed relationship. Both the patient and partner completed the Dyadic Adjustment Scale, a measure of relationship quality, the Profile of Mood States (POMS) and the SF-36. Comparisons using MANOVA were examined for role (patient/partner) and gender differences. There were no significant effects for role or gender by selfreport on the POMS however, female patients approached significance (p = 0.058). Significant effects were found for patient/ partner role in mental health, physical health and dyadic adjustment. As expected, patients&AElig; general health was lower with a mean of 51.82 (SD 17.88) compared to partners&AElig; general health of 69.69 (SD 17.00). Patients had greater marital satisfaction (p &lt; .011) with a mean of 121.82 (SD 14.96) compared to 118.88 (SD 15.94) for partners. There were significant role and gender effects (p &lt; .015) for mental health. Female partner mean of 70.12 (SD 20.77) was closer to male patient mean of 68.82 (SD 20.35) and female patient mean of 66.77 (SD 19.42). Male partner mean of 77.12 (SD 15.60) indicated less discouragement than female partners. Partners of cancer patients frequently assume greater responsibilities and results suggest that partners should be supported as their lives undergo adaptations to the effects cancer has on the dyad.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:06:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:06:51Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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