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Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164783
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Shush...Implementation of Quiet Time in a Comprehensive Cancer Center
Author(s):
Ong, Yvette
Author Details:
Yvette Ong, MS, BSN, RN, OCN, Associate Director, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email:yong@mdanderson.org
Abstract:
Clinical/Evidence Based Practice: Rest allows for patients to recuperate. With the increase in activity during both day and night, noise is one of our patientsÆ major vulnerable situation and daunting environment. Quiet Time was implemented on several units in the institution to allow patients to have time to themselves in the middle of a hectic day. The goals are to reduce noise in the hospital and increase patient satisfaction. A Yacker Tracker (noise indicator device) is utilized to monitor the noise levels in the units. An hour in the middle of the day was designated as Quiet Time, but varied among units depending on unique activity schedules. During Quiet Time time, the lights are dimmed, the patientsÆ doors are closed, overhead paging is reduced, and all members of the multidisciplinary team avoid doing patient rounds. Nurses play a huge role as they communicate this initiative with patients, visitors, and staff from other departments, ensure that patients' immediate needs are met prior to Quiet Time, and remind all staff to speak in low tones when Quiet Time is ongoing. The initiative was communicated with all unit staff and members of the multidisciplinary team and was publicized through posters displayed in the pods during Quiet Time. Anecdotal evidence suggests that interventions are working. Patients verbalized that they love Quiet Time. As this project is ongoing, NRC Picker scores relating to noise have been and will continue to be monitored. Pre- and post- Quiet Time scores will be compared. Interventions will be adapted and additional measures implemented if scores do not show improvement from baseline. Measures discussed may prove to be helpful to other oncology nurses who are faced with this similar problem in their hospitals. Even with the small amount of time allowed for peace and quiet, the patients' well being may be significantly impacted.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleShush...Implementation of Quiet Time in a Comprehensive Cancer Centeren_GB
dc.contributor.authorOng, Yvetteen_US
dc.author.detailsYvette Ong, MS, BSN, RN, OCN, Associate Director, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email:yong@mdanderson.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164783-
dc.description.abstractClinical/Evidence Based Practice: Rest allows for patients to recuperate. With the increase in activity during both day and night, noise is one of our patientsÆ major vulnerable situation and daunting environment. Quiet Time was implemented on several units in the institution to allow patients to have time to themselves in the middle of a hectic day. The goals are to reduce noise in the hospital and increase patient satisfaction. A Yacker Tracker (noise indicator device) is utilized to monitor the noise levels in the units. An hour in the middle of the day was designated as Quiet Time, but varied among units depending on unique activity schedules. During Quiet Time time, the lights are dimmed, the patientsÆ doors are closed, overhead paging is reduced, and all members of the multidisciplinary team avoid doing patient rounds. Nurses play a huge role as they communicate this initiative with patients, visitors, and staff from other departments, ensure that patients' immediate needs are met prior to Quiet Time, and remind all staff to speak in low tones when Quiet Time is ongoing. The initiative was communicated with all unit staff and members of the multidisciplinary team and was publicized through posters displayed in the pods during Quiet Time. Anecdotal evidence suggests that interventions are working. Patients verbalized that they love Quiet Time. As this project is ongoing, NRC Picker scores relating to noise have been and will continue to be monitored. Pre- and post- Quiet Time scores will be compared. Interventions will be adapted and additional measures implemented if scores do not show improvement from baseline. Measures discussed may prove to be helpful to other oncology nurses who are faced with this similar problem in their hospitals. Even with the small amount of time allowed for peace and quiet, the patients' well being may be significantly impacted.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:06:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:06:55Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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