2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164788
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of Fatigue on Role Functioning during Radiation Therapy
Author(s):
Poirier, Patricia
Author Details:
Patricia Poirier, PhD, RN, AOCN, Assistant Professor, University of Maine, Orono, Maine, USA, email: mainedreams@verizon.net
Abstract:
Research Study: Side effects of treatment such as fatigue may impact patients' ability to maintain their usual activities, including work, household chores, and social activities. Oncology nurses are in a unique position to design interventions to help patients maintain those activities at greatest risk for disruption. A priority topic of the ONS is to maintain or promote physical function, functional status, or functional ability of individuals who receive cancer treatment. A research recommendation is to identify disease or treatment-related correlates of changes in physical functioning prior to effectively designing and implementing interventions. The purpose of the current study was to identify the impact of one treatment-related correlate, fatigue, on the ability of patients to carry out specific activities during radiation therapy. The role performance mode of the Roy Adaptation Model guided the selection of items to be analyzed and the grouping of activities into primary, secondary, and tertiary roles. A secondary analysis was conducted on data collected from seventy-seven participants recruited from one community hospital radiation therapy department. Data had been collected prospectively at baseline, weekly during treatment, and at the end of treatment. Individual items from two well-established fatigue instruments, the revised Piper Fatigue Scale and the Brief Fatigue Inventory, that were related to activities of daily living were analyzed. These items were grouped into primary (basic activities of daily living such as walking and general activity), secondary (work and school activities) and tertiary (socialization with family and friends) roles. Paired t-tests were used to test for differences in performance of each role at each measurement point. Fatigue impacted functioning in all three roles although the impact was minimal. There was greater disruption in secondary roles than in primary or tertiary roles. There was a statistically significant difference in functioning in all roles between baseline and the end of treatment. Patients continued to maintain their basic activities of daily living and tertiary roles such as socializing with friends. Patients had greater difficulty maintaining work, both in and out of the home, and school activities. Future research where performance of specific activities is the primary outcome of interest is indicated.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of Fatigue on Role Functioning during Radiation Therapyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPoirier, Patriciaen_US
dc.author.detailsPatricia Poirier, PhD, RN, AOCN, Assistant Professor, University of Maine, Orono, Maine, USA, email: mainedreams@verizon.neten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164788-
dc.description.abstractResearch Study: Side effects of treatment such as fatigue may impact patients' ability to maintain their usual activities, including work, household chores, and social activities. Oncology nurses are in a unique position to design interventions to help patients maintain those activities at greatest risk for disruption. A priority topic of the ONS is to maintain or promote physical function, functional status, or functional ability of individuals who receive cancer treatment. A research recommendation is to identify disease or treatment-related correlates of changes in physical functioning prior to effectively designing and implementing interventions. The purpose of the current study was to identify the impact of one treatment-related correlate, fatigue, on the ability of patients to carry out specific activities during radiation therapy. The role performance mode of the Roy Adaptation Model guided the selection of items to be analyzed and the grouping of activities into primary, secondary, and tertiary roles. A secondary analysis was conducted on data collected from seventy-seven participants recruited from one community hospital radiation therapy department. Data had been collected prospectively at baseline, weekly during treatment, and at the end of treatment. Individual items from two well-established fatigue instruments, the revised Piper Fatigue Scale and the Brief Fatigue Inventory, that were related to activities of daily living were analyzed. These items were grouped into primary (basic activities of daily living such as walking and general activity), secondary (work and school activities) and tertiary (socialization with family and friends) roles. Paired t-tests were used to test for differences in performance of each role at each measurement point. Fatigue impacted functioning in all three roles although the impact was minimal. There was greater disruption in secondary roles than in primary or tertiary roles. There was a statistically significant difference in functioning in all roles between baseline and the end of treatment. Patients continued to maintain their basic activities of daily living and tertiary roles such as socializing with friends. Patients had greater difficulty maintaining work, both in and out of the home, and school activities. Future research where performance of specific activities is the primary outcome of interest is indicated.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:07:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:07:01Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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