Nursing Internship Program: Assisting New Nurses in the Transition from Student to Oncology Nurse

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Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164799
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Internship Program: Assisting New Nurses in the Transition from Student to Oncology Nurse
Author(s):
Rumble, Michelle
Author Details:
Michelle Rumble, RN, MSN, MPH, PHCNS-BC, Hospital Education Coordinator, George Washington University Hospital, Washington, DC, USA, email: mmrumble@gmail.com
Abstract:
Education: Dealing with the emotional, psychosocial, and physical needs of cancer patients can be a daunting task for any oncology nurse. However, these tasks are considerably more challenging for new nurses. Often, new nursing graduates simply do not posses the proper knowledge, tools, and skills that are required to provide safe and effective care for oncology patients. The purpose of the Nurse Internship Program is to assist new nurses with the difficult transition from student to oncology nurse. The Nurse Internship Program is a didactic 10-week program, which consists of classroom and clinical time. In the classroom, information is provided in the form of lectures and classroom discussions. The goal is to create an open, comfortable and interactive environment where the interns learn from the instructor and from one another. The classroom sessions cover a variety of topics such as pain management, end of life care, oncology, and time management. These topics are selected based on the needs expressed by previous interns as well as what current literature recommends. During their clinical time, the interns are assigned to an experienced oncology nurse who will function as their primary preceptor. These preceptors are given a specific training course, offered by the HospitalÆs Education Staff. This training course provides lectures on leadership, teaching, helpful hints, and the logistics of being a preceptor. Throughout the Internship Program, the internÆs progression is constantly monitored. This is achieved through formal evaluations as well as regular discussions between the intern, the preceptor, the Director, and the Nurse Educator. This program is evaluated by using a combination of Likert scales and open-ended questions. Overall, the response has been very positive. Comments have included statements such as ôNice way to enter nursingö and ôReally liked the mix of class and clinical time.ö Due to the increasing demand for oncology nurses, retention in acute care settings is extremely important. Therefore it is vital for healthcare institutions to nurture new graduates so that they may grow into capable, knowledgeable, and compassionate oncology.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Internship Program: Assisting New Nurses in the Transition from Student to Oncology Nurseen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRumble, Michelleen_US
dc.author.detailsMichelle Rumble, RN, MSN, MPH, PHCNS-BC, Hospital Education Coordinator, George Washington University Hospital, Washington, DC, USA, email: mmrumble@gmail.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164799-
dc.description.abstractEducation: Dealing with the emotional, psychosocial, and physical needs of cancer patients can be a daunting task for any oncology nurse. However, these tasks are considerably more challenging for new nurses. Often, new nursing graduates simply do not posses the proper knowledge, tools, and skills that are required to provide safe and effective care for oncology patients. The purpose of the Nurse Internship Program is to assist new nurses with the difficult transition from student to oncology nurse. The Nurse Internship Program is a didactic 10-week program, which consists of classroom and clinical time. In the classroom, information is provided in the form of lectures and classroom discussions. The goal is to create an open, comfortable and interactive environment where the interns learn from the instructor and from one another. The classroom sessions cover a variety of topics such as pain management, end of life care, oncology, and time management. These topics are selected based on the needs expressed by previous interns as well as what current literature recommends. During their clinical time, the interns are assigned to an experienced oncology nurse who will function as their primary preceptor. These preceptors are given a specific training course, offered by the HospitalÆs Education Staff. This training course provides lectures on leadership, teaching, helpful hints, and the logistics of being a preceptor. Throughout the Internship Program, the internÆs progression is constantly monitored. This is achieved through formal evaluations as well as regular discussions between the intern, the preceptor, the Director, and the Nurse Educator. This program is evaluated by using a combination of Likert scales and open-ended questions. Overall, the response has been very positive. Comments have included statements such as ôNice way to enter nursingö and ôReally liked the mix of class and clinical time.ö Due to the increasing demand for oncology nurses, retention in acute care settings is extremely important. Therefore it is vital for healthcare institutions to nurture new graduates so that they may grow into capable, knowledgeable, and compassionate oncology.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:07:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:07:13Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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