A Multidisciplinary Team's Development and Use of Red Flag Tools and Processes to Improve Treatment Times in Cancer Patients with Febrile Neutropenia

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164801
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Multidisciplinary Team's Development and Use of Red Flag Tools and Processes to Improve Treatment Times in Cancer Patients with Febrile Neutropenia
Author(s):
Schreiner, Michelle; Hawley, Erika; Loney, Molly
Author Details:
Michelle Schreiner, RN, OCN, Oncology Coordinator, Cleveland Clinic Cancer Center at Hillcrest Hospital, Mayfield Heights, Ohio, USA, email: schreim3@ccf.org; Erika Hawley, RN, BSN, OCN; Molly Loney, RN, MSN, AOCN
Abstract:
Clinical/Evidence Based Practice: Febrile neutropenia continues as a potential life-threatening emergency for patients following chemotherapy. Delays persist in patients seeking medical attention and receiving timely treatment (chart audits identified up to a seven hour delay). A multidisciplinary team was formed between the cancer center and ED to develop throughput processes and educational tools needed to provide febrile patients with safe passage during chemotherapyinduced neutropenia. Th goal was to share multidisciplinary best practice model and tools for timely symptom recognition and evidence-based one hour benchmark of antibiotic administration to patients presenting with febrile neutropenia. The team created an algorithm for managing neutropenic fever and standing orders. Staff and physicians were educated in the cancer center and ED about critical needs for timely management of febrile neutropenia and available tools. Oncology nursing staff were able to look beyond their point of contact in providing anticipatory guidance by developing two tangible take home tools for reinforcing education and quick action when a neutropenic fever occurs. A neutropenic fever red flag alert magnet and wallet card, outlining directions on what to do if febrile, were provided to the patient upon initial chemotherapy education. A neutropenic fever team process quickly rerouted febrile cancer patients from the ED to the cancer center for timely throughput. Staff were assigned to the team daily with roles and responsibilities defined and a process checklist provided to achieve the one hour benchmark. Multidisciplinary team collaboration between the cancer center and ED provided a vehicle for Oncology nurses and physicians to critically analyze their practice and develop pathways for timely assessment and treatment of this vulnerable population. Concurrent chart audits reveal a door-to-antibiotic time of less than the one hour benchmark in the cancer center after implementing the neutropenic fever team process and utilizing the educational tools. The identified patient population is treated effectively in a familiar and comfortable environment with known specialized nurses and trusted physicians. Nurses are encouraged to implement this best practice model in different settings by utilizing the patient and staff tools provided. Research is needed to identify how throughput processes and educational tools improve clinical outcomes for cancer patients with chemotherapy-induced neutropenic fever.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Multidisciplinary Team's Development and Use of Red Flag Tools and Processes to Improve Treatment Times in Cancer Patients with Febrile Neutropeniaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSchreiner, Michelleen_US
dc.contributor.authorHawley, Erikaen_US
dc.contributor.authorLoney, Mollyen_US
dc.author.detailsMichelle Schreiner, RN, OCN, Oncology Coordinator, Cleveland Clinic Cancer Center at Hillcrest Hospital, Mayfield Heights, Ohio, USA, email: schreim3@ccf.org; Erika Hawley, RN, BSN, OCN; Molly Loney, RN, MSN, AOCNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164801-
dc.description.abstractClinical/Evidence Based Practice: Febrile neutropenia continues as a potential life-threatening emergency for patients following chemotherapy. Delays persist in patients seeking medical attention and receiving timely treatment (chart audits identified up to a seven hour delay). A multidisciplinary team was formed between the cancer center and ED to develop throughput processes and educational tools needed to provide febrile patients with safe passage during chemotherapyinduced neutropenia. Th goal was to share multidisciplinary best practice model and tools for timely symptom recognition and evidence-based one hour benchmark of antibiotic administration to patients presenting with febrile neutropenia. The team created an algorithm for managing neutropenic fever and standing orders. Staff and physicians were educated in the cancer center and ED about critical needs for timely management of febrile neutropenia and available tools. Oncology nursing staff were able to look beyond their point of contact in providing anticipatory guidance by developing two tangible take home tools for reinforcing education and quick action when a neutropenic fever occurs. A neutropenic fever red flag alert magnet and wallet card, outlining directions on what to do if febrile, were provided to the patient upon initial chemotherapy education. A neutropenic fever team process quickly rerouted febrile cancer patients from the ED to the cancer center for timely throughput. Staff were assigned to the team daily with roles and responsibilities defined and a process checklist provided to achieve the one hour benchmark. Multidisciplinary team collaboration between the cancer center and ED provided a vehicle for Oncology nurses and physicians to critically analyze their practice and develop pathways for timely assessment and treatment of this vulnerable population. Concurrent chart audits reveal a door-to-antibiotic time of less than the one hour benchmark in the cancer center after implementing the neutropenic fever team process and utilizing the educational tools. The identified patient population is treated effectively in a familiar and comfortable environment with known specialized nurses and trusted physicians. Nurses are encouraged to implement this best practice model in different settings by utilizing the patient and staff tools provided. Research is needed to identify how throughput processes and educational tools improve clinical outcomes for cancer patients with chemotherapy-induced neutropenic fever.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:07:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:07:15Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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