2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164804
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patients on Docetaxel: Improving their Quality of Life with Education
Author(s):
Sferrazza, Beth
Author Details:
Beth Sferrazza, Beth, RN, BSN, OCN, Clinical Nurse IV, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, email: sferrazb@mskcc.org
Abstract:
Education: Epiphora, a condition defined as excessive tearing occurs in 64% of weekly docetaxel patients and 39% of patients receiving docetaxel every three weeks. Docetaxel is secreted in the tears causing inflammation of the nasolacrimal drainage ducts. Methods of treatment include: moisturizing, corticosteroid or antimicrobial eye drops, dacryocystorhinostomy, and silicone or Pyrex tube insertion. Nurses most routinely educate docetaxel patients on the side effects of hypersensitivity, peripheral neuropathy, and myelosuppression; less frequently on epiphora. Teaching nurses about this side effect may improve patient education and ultimately the patient's quality of life. An educated nurse and patient could lead to early detection and intervention. Patients would be more equipped to recognize and report early chemotherapy nurses were educated on epiphora. The hospital's patient education materials and nursing documentation on patient education were changed to include epiphora as a side effect of docetaxel. A plan of care was developed with the medical oncologists and ophthalmologists for patients at risk for epiphora. At baseline, documentation of epiphora education did not exist. Following the interventions, a retrospective chart review revealed that 30% of patients received education about epiphora. The evaluation of documentation demonstrated an increase in the presence of patient education on this side effect. More nursing research is needed to determine the relationship between education and the identification of epiphora symptoms as related to improving the patient's quality of life. This presentation will present an evidenced based overview of epiphora, our findings regarding the presence of patient education, and a description of changes made to patient education materials and nursing documentation. signs and symptoms of epiphora; nurses would have a heightened awareness to routinely assess for this condition. Resolution of epiphora can decrease visual problems with activities such as driving and reading. A comprehensive literature search using the Pubmed, Cinahl, Ovid, and the Cochrane Library was conducted using the terms, docetaxel and epiphora, canalicular stenosis, excessive tearing, and eye complications. A presentation was developed from the researched evidence. An educational program was developed and presented from January through April 2008; approximately 50 outpatient.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatients on Docetaxel: Improving their Quality of Life with Educationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSferrazza, Bethen_US
dc.author.detailsBeth Sferrazza, Beth, RN, BSN, OCN, Clinical Nurse IV, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, email: sferrazb@mskcc.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164804-
dc.description.abstractEducation: Epiphora, a condition defined as excessive tearing occurs in 64% of weekly docetaxel patients and 39% of patients receiving docetaxel every three weeks. Docetaxel is secreted in the tears causing inflammation of the nasolacrimal drainage ducts. Methods of treatment include: moisturizing, corticosteroid or antimicrobial eye drops, dacryocystorhinostomy, and silicone or Pyrex tube insertion. Nurses most routinely educate docetaxel patients on the side effects of hypersensitivity, peripheral neuropathy, and myelosuppression; less frequently on epiphora. Teaching nurses about this side effect may improve patient education and ultimately the patient's quality of life. An educated nurse and patient could lead to early detection and intervention. Patients would be more equipped to recognize and report early chemotherapy nurses were educated on epiphora. The hospital's patient education materials and nursing documentation on patient education were changed to include epiphora as a side effect of docetaxel. A plan of care was developed with the medical oncologists and ophthalmologists for patients at risk for epiphora. At baseline, documentation of epiphora education did not exist. Following the interventions, a retrospective chart review revealed that 30% of patients received education about epiphora. The evaluation of documentation demonstrated an increase in the presence of patient education on this side effect. More nursing research is needed to determine the relationship between education and the identification of epiphora symptoms as related to improving the patient's quality of life. This presentation will present an evidenced based overview of epiphora, our findings regarding the presence of patient education, and a description of changes made to patient education materials and nursing documentation. signs and symptoms of epiphora; nurses would have a heightened awareness to routinely assess for this condition. Resolution of epiphora can decrease visual problems with activities such as driving and reading. A comprehensive literature search using the Pubmed, Cinahl, Ovid, and the Cochrane Library was conducted using the terms, docetaxel and epiphora, canalicular stenosis, excessive tearing, and eye complications. A presentation was developed from the researched evidence. An educational program was developed and presented from January through April 2008; approximately 50 outpatient.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:07:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:07:18Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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