PUTTING EVIDENCE INTO PRACTICE: THE AMBULATORY NURSE'S RECOGNITION OF AND RESPONSE TO DEPRESSION IN THE ADULT CANCER PATIENT

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164811
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PUTTING EVIDENCE INTO PRACTICE: THE AMBULATORY NURSE'S RECOGNITION OF AND RESPONSE TO DEPRESSION IN THE ADULT CANCER PATIENT
Author(s):
Solan, Jill; Delacruz, Anthony; Brown, Richard F.
Author Details:
Jill Solan, RN, MS, ANP, OCN, CNIV, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, email: solanj@mskcc.org; Anthony Delacruz, RN, BSN, OCN; Richard F. Brown, PhD
Abstract:
Education: Depression in the adult cancer patient is prevalent and most studies estimate that 25% of patients meet criteria for having a major depressive syndrome. Research demonstrates that nurses often fail to recognize depressive symptoms in their patient population. Nurses devote a great deal of time in caring for their patients and are in prime positions to identify and respond to their depression. A review of the literature confirmed that patients, family members and health care providers often have misconceptions about depression and face a number of barriers that obscure its recognition. A collaborative initiative involving the divisions of nursing and behavorial sciences addressed the question: Can communication skills training (CST) improve the nurses' ability to recognize and respond to a patient's depression? Two workshops were developed to meet the objectives of the CST program. In the first workshop, nurses were taught basic communication skills. The second workshop provided them with specific skills needed to identify and respond to a patient's depression. This combined a didactic session that provided an overview on depression including risk factors, barriers, symptoms and treatments options. Six key communication strategies and skills were introduced. The nurse participants practiced these skills and strategies using videotaped role-play with actors who portrayed patients and feedback from trained facilitators. Twelve nurses participated in the pilot program. Pre and posttraining assessment of the participant's communication skills were performed using video recorded patient assessments. Each participant was rated on a four point scale by expert raters. Course evaluations at the conclusion of each workshop were completed by each nurse rating their confidence level in dealing with patient depression. Statistically significant improvements in ratings of the nurse's attempts at 3/6 strategies were observed after training and a trend to significance was observed in a fourth strategy. Participants also indicated increased confidence in discussing depression. Early results of the program are favorable and an application has been submitted for a NIH R21 grant to support future training programs. Patient depression is a common problem this program has potential in training nurses in all practice areas to identify and recognize depression.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePUTTING EVIDENCE INTO PRACTICE: THE AMBULATORY NURSE'S RECOGNITION OF AND RESPONSE TO DEPRESSION IN THE ADULT CANCER PATIENTen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSolan, Jillen_US
dc.contributor.authorDelacruz, Anthonyen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Richard F.en_US
dc.author.detailsJill Solan, RN, MS, ANP, OCN, CNIV, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, email: solanj@mskcc.org; Anthony Delacruz, RN, BSN, OCN; Richard F. Brown, PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164811-
dc.description.abstractEducation: Depression in the adult cancer patient is prevalent and most studies estimate that 25% of patients meet criteria for having a major depressive syndrome. Research demonstrates that nurses often fail to recognize depressive symptoms in their patient population. Nurses devote a great deal of time in caring for their patients and are in prime positions to identify and respond to their depression. A review of the literature confirmed that patients, family members and health care providers often have misconceptions about depression and face a number of barriers that obscure its recognition. A collaborative initiative involving the divisions of nursing and behavorial sciences addressed the question: Can communication skills training (CST) improve the nurses' ability to recognize and respond to a patient's depression? Two workshops were developed to meet the objectives of the CST program. In the first workshop, nurses were taught basic communication skills. The second workshop provided them with specific skills needed to identify and respond to a patient's depression. This combined a didactic session that provided an overview on depression including risk factors, barriers, symptoms and treatments options. Six key communication strategies and skills were introduced. The nurse participants practiced these skills and strategies using videotaped role-play with actors who portrayed patients and feedback from trained facilitators. Twelve nurses participated in the pilot program. Pre and posttraining assessment of the participant's communication skills were performed using video recorded patient assessments. Each participant was rated on a four point scale by expert raters. Course evaluations at the conclusion of each workshop were completed by each nurse rating their confidence level in dealing with patient depression. Statistically significant improvements in ratings of the nurse's attempts at 3/6 strategies were observed after training and a trend to significance was observed in a fourth strategy. Participants also indicated increased confidence in discussing depression. Early results of the program are favorable and an application has been submitted for a NIH R21 grant to support future training programs. Patient depression is a common problem this program has potential in training nurses in all practice areas to identify and recognize depression.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:07:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:07:26Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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