Current Korean experience: Effective management of the hand-foot syndrome in colon cancer patients receiving capecitabine as adjuvant chemotherapy.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164813
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Current Korean experience: Effective management of the hand-foot syndrome in colon cancer patients receiving capecitabine as adjuvant chemotherapy.
Author(s):
Son, Hyun Sook; Lee, Woo Yong; Chun, Ho-Kyung
Author Details:
Hyun Sook Son, RN, Colorectal Cancer Coordinator, Samsung Medical Center, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul, South Korea, email: hyunsook75.son@samsung.com; Woo Yong Lee, MD; Ho-Kyung Chun, MD
Abstract:
Clinical/Evidence Based Practice: It is widely accepted that capecitabine is noticeably efficacious as an auxiliary anticancer treatment for oncology cancer and capecitabine is a safe and effective treatment method replacing the existing injection medication, 5-FU/LV, having equivalent results due to convenience of oral medication comparing with injection medication. However, there is a difficulty in observing fulfillment of treatment and managing adverse events because the medication and treatment is mainly carried out off hospital. Especially, the hand-foot syndrome(HFS) is the only clinical adverse event that commonly occurs with capecitabine treatment. The objective of our study was to describe the incidence and effective management of the hand-foot syndrome (HFS) and the compliance with treatment of patients with stage IIB, IIIA, IIIB, and IIIC colon cancer that were treated with capecitabine alone as adjuvant therapy. Between 19 October 2005 and 22 July 2007, 128 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were included in this retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. An oncology nurse enrolled subjects during the first round of treatment and collected data on the management of HFS; the data included five interviews and four phone-call audits. The median patient age was 62 (range: 29-84 years). The treatment compliance rate was 93.8% (120 out of the 128 patients). The HFS developed in 99 patients (77.4%). Forty seven patients (36.7%) had grade 1 HFS, 39 patients (30.5%) had grade 2 HFS and 13 patients (10.2%) had grade 3 HFS, as their most severe episode. For Grade 1 patients, the dose was maintained, and skin barrier cream and MEBO (moist exposed burn ointment) were applied. For Grade 2 patients, either the dose was maintained or 25% of the dose was reduced; MEBO and supportive care were provided. For Grade 3 patients, one cycle of chemotherapy was interrupted followed by dose adjustment; MEBO and supportive care were provided. HFS is manageable if both the patients and oncology care teams are educated about HFS associated with capecitabine. The HFS is treated by patient education, preventive management, ointment application, conservative management, dose reduction, and interruption of chemotherapy administration. The individual patients' condition and situation must also be considered. The active participation of patient and the oncology nurse is key to effective management of the HFS.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCurrent Korean experience: Effective management of the hand-foot syndrome in colon cancer patients receiving capecitabine as adjuvant chemotherapy.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorSon, Hyun Sooken_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, Woo Yongen_US
dc.contributor.authorChun, Ho-Kyungen_US
dc.author.detailsHyun Sook Son, RN, Colorectal Cancer Coordinator, Samsung Medical Center, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul, South Korea, email: hyunsook75.son@samsung.com; Woo Yong Lee, MD; Ho-Kyung Chun, MDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164813-
dc.description.abstractClinical/Evidence Based Practice: It is widely accepted that capecitabine is noticeably efficacious as an auxiliary anticancer treatment for oncology cancer and capecitabine is a safe and effective treatment method replacing the existing injection medication, 5-FU/LV, having equivalent results due to convenience of oral medication comparing with injection medication. However, there is a difficulty in observing fulfillment of treatment and managing adverse events because the medication and treatment is mainly carried out off hospital. Especially, the hand-foot syndrome(HFS) is the only clinical adverse event that commonly occurs with capecitabine treatment. The objective of our study was to describe the incidence and effective management of the hand-foot syndrome (HFS) and the compliance with treatment of patients with stage IIB, IIIA, IIIB, and IIIC colon cancer that were treated with capecitabine alone as adjuvant therapy. Between 19 October 2005 and 22 July 2007, 128 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were included in this retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. An oncology nurse enrolled subjects during the first round of treatment and collected data on the management of HFS; the data included five interviews and four phone-call audits. The median patient age was 62 (range: 29-84 years). The treatment compliance rate was 93.8% (120 out of the 128 patients). The HFS developed in 99 patients (77.4%). Forty seven patients (36.7%) had grade 1 HFS, 39 patients (30.5%) had grade 2 HFS and 13 patients (10.2%) had grade 3 HFS, as their most severe episode. For Grade 1 patients, the dose was maintained, and skin barrier cream and MEBO (moist exposed burn ointment) were applied. For Grade 2 patients, either the dose was maintained or 25% of the dose was reduced; MEBO and supportive care were provided. For Grade 3 patients, one cycle of chemotherapy was interrupted followed by dose adjustment; MEBO and supportive care were provided. HFS is manageable if both the patients and oncology care teams are educated about HFS associated with capecitabine. The HFS is treated by patient education, preventive management, ointment application, conservative management, dose reduction, and interruption of chemotherapy administration. The individual patients' condition and situation must also be considered. The active participation of patient and the oncology nurse is key to effective management of the HFS.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:07:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:07:28Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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