Delivering a consistent message: Standardizing an Ambulatory Preceptor Program

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164818
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Delivering a consistent message: Standardizing an Ambulatory Preceptor Program
Author(s):
Steinbauer, Rita; Houchin, Laura; Payne, Judith; Waters, Mark; Conder, Parthey
Author Details:
Rita Steinbauer, RN, BSN, OCN, Oncology Nurse Clinician IV, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: stein011@mc.duke.edu; Laura Houchin, RN, MSN, OCN; Judith Payne, PhD, RN, AOCN, CS; Mark Waters, RN, MPH, OCN; Parthey Conder, RN
Abstract:
Education: Precepting a new nurse in a busy academic outpatient oncology infusion center can prove to be a nursing challenge. Our center treats an average of 120 patients daily so it is vital to teach evidence-based instruction in a standardized and efficient manner. Surveys conducted by our senior nursing staff indicated that the last four nurses oriented to our unit felt their learning experience did not provide consistent information regarding unit based competencies including chemotherapy administration. This inconsistent knowledge base led to inefficient nurse productivity and extended orientation time. This presentation will discuss the development of a preceptor program that utilizes the most qualified and experienced nursing staff to develop a consistent unit-based preceptor program. Teaching/learning experiences that are implemented in the clinic setting will be highlighted. Our unit based orientation program needed to change in two ways: 1) content and 2) evaluation. Our current orientation packet was restructured to delineate clear, measurable, and obtainable objectives for each day of the four week orientation. The preceptor was able to state if goals were met or needed to be revised at a weekly meeting with the nurse manager. The orienting nurse also reviewed teaching objectives, weekly, with the nurse manager at a separate meeting. Problems were identified early and teaching plans altered to meet the nurse's needs. Nursing management selected preceptors systematically based on their oncology expertise, teaching capability and interpersonal approach. Each preceptor was instructed on expectations and teaching guidelines that needed to be met with each nurse orientee The program was recently implemented with 100% satisfaction from new orientees and their preceptors while 95% of the nursing staff surveyed felt the new orientees were performing more confidently and efficiently within our unit post orientation period. By focusing on the delineation of the teaching objectives and systematically choosing unit based preceptors, we have created a consistent, quality orientation program. Nursing input in a new orientation format led to an increase in productivity and quality nursing care for our oncology patients.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDelivering a consistent message: Standardizing an Ambulatory Preceptor Programen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSteinbauer, Ritaen_US
dc.contributor.authorHouchin, Lauraen_US
dc.contributor.authorPayne, Judithen_US
dc.contributor.authorWaters, Marken_US
dc.contributor.authorConder, Partheyen_US
dc.author.detailsRita Steinbauer, RN, BSN, OCN, Oncology Nurse Clinician IV, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: stein011@mc.duke.edu; Laura Houchin, RN, MSN, OCN; Judith Payne, PhD, RN, AOCN, CS; Mark Waters, RN, MPH, OCN; Parthey Conder, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164818-
dc.description.abstractEducation: Precepting a new nurse in a busy academic outpatient oncology infusion center can prove to be a nursing challenge. Our center treats an average of 120 patients daily so it is vital to teach evidence-based instruction in a standardized and efficient manner. Surveys conducted by our senior nursing staff indicated that the last four nurses oriented to our unit felt their learning experience did not provide consistent information regarding unit based competencies including chemotherapy administration. This inconsistent knowledge base led to inefficient nurse productivity and extended orientation time. This presentation will discuss the development of a preceptor program that utilizes the most qualified and experienced nursing staff to develop a consistent unit-based preceptor program. Teaching/learning experiences that are implemented in the clinic setting will be highlighted. Our unit based orientation program needed to change in two ways: 1) content and 2) evaluation. Our current orientation packet was restructured to delineate clear, measurable, and obtainable objectives for each day of the four week orientation. The preceptor was able to state if goals were met or needed to be revised at a weekly meeting with the nurse manager. The orienting nurse also reviewed teaching objectives, weekly, with the nurse manager at a separate meeting. Problems were identified early and teaching plans altered to meet the nurse's needs. Nursing management selected preceptors systematically based on their oncology expertise, teaching capability and interpersonal approach. Each preceptor was instructed on expectations and teaching guidelines that needed to be met with each nurse orientee The program was recently implemented with 100% satisfaction from new orientees and their preceptors while 95% of the nursing staff surveyed felt the new orientees were performing more confidently and efficiently within our unit post orientation period. By focusing on the delineation of the teaching objectives and systematically choosing unit based preceptors, we have created a consistent, quality orientation program. Nursing input in a new orientation format led to an increase in productivity and quality nursing care for our oncology patients.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:07:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:07:34Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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